George Mason University

A few Mason Author titles to consider

2 years 10 months ago

This week, we are highlighting some recent publications by Mason authors, representing various academic disciplines and viewpoints. All are available for checkout from the Libraries! Remember, you can find more faculty and alumni publications and profiles over at the Mason Spirit. You can find more titles in the Libraries’ collection by checking out our Faculty Author Collection at bit.ly/masonauthors. And, don’t forget about the next Libraries’ Mason Author Series event on Thursday, November 16 at 3pm in the Fenwick Main Reading Room, where Patricia Donahue will discuss Participation, Community, and Public Policy in a Virginia Suburb.

The Chance of Salvation: A History of Conversion in America
Lincoln A. Mullen, Assistant Professor, History and Art History

The Chance of Salvation (Harvard University Press, August 2017) offers a history of conversions in the United States which shows how religious identity came to be a matter of choice. By uncovering the way religious identity is structured as obligatory decision, this book explores why Americans change religions and why the U.S. is both highly religious in terms of religious affiliation and very secular in the sense that no religion is an unquestioned default.

Trump Effect 
Karina V. Korostelina, Professor, School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution

In Trump Effect (Routledge, October 2016), Korostelina explains how the support for Trump among the American general public is based on three pillars: 1) Trump champions a specific conception of American national identity that empowers his supporters, 2) Trump’s leadership has been crafted from his ability to recognize where and with whom he can get the most return on his investment, and 3) Trump challenges the existing political balance of power within the United States and globally.

Governing Under Stress: The Implementation of Obama’s Economic Stimulus Program
Timothy J. Conlan, Priscilla M. Regan, and Paul L. Posner, Schar School of Policy and Government

Governing Under Stress (Georgetown University Press, January 2017) presents perspectives on the implementation and performance of President Obama’s economic stimulus program, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). It explores the management of ARRA within all levels of government as well as its portrayals in the media and public perception. Contributors draw upon more than 200 interviews and nationwide field research to present insights into the challenges facing public policy and management.

Resolving Structural Conflicts: How Violent Systems Can Be Transformed
Richard E. Rubenstein, University Professor, School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution

Resolving Structural Conflicts (Routledge, January 2017) analyzes how certain social systems generate violent conflict and discusses how such systems can be transformed to create the conditions for positive peace. The book addresses a key issue in the field of conflict studies: what to do about violent conflicts that are not the results of misunderstanding, prejudice, or malice, but the products of a social system that generates violent conflict as part of its normal operations.

The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream
Tyler Cowen, BS Economics ’83, Holbert L. Harris Chair of Economics; Distinguished Senior Fellow, F.A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics; and General Director, Mercatus Center

In The Complacent Class (St. Martin’s Press, February 2017), Cowen examines the trend of Americans away from the traditionally mobile, risk-accepting, and adaptable tendencies that defined them for much of recent history, and toward stagnation and comfort. He argues that this development has the potential to make future changes more disruptive.

Jessica Clark

Artists’ Book Vendors Visit

2 years 10 months ago

Interested in artists’ books and zine collections? Or how the University Libraries considers collection additions? Stop by Fenwick Library next week when the Libraries host two artists’ book vendors. The visits are open to the entire Mason community. Faculty are especially encouraged to attend and provide feedback on potential artists’ book purchases.

Booklyn Artist Alliance
Monday, November 13, 10am – 12pm
Special Collections Research Center (Fenwick Library, Room 2400), Seminar Room

Booklyn’s mission is to promote artists’ books as art and research material and to assist artists and organizations in documenting, exhibiting, and distributing their artworks and archives. Felice Tebbe will visiting us with the latest in artist’s books, print folios, and zines.

Vamp & Tramp Booksellers
Tuesday, November 14, 10:30am – 1pm
Special Collections Research Center (Fenwick Library, Room 2400), Seminar Room

Vamp & Tramp specialize in contemporary fine press and artists’ books representing a diverse body of artists and techniques, and will bring some of the newest arrivals to their collection for us to consider. Learn more at http://www.vampandtramp.com

Jessica Clark

Libraries welcomes Mason Families!

2 years 10 months ago

The Mason Libraries welcomes families this week, with two special events as part of Mason’s Family Weekend (November 10-12, 2017).

On Friday, November 10, from 3pm to 4pm, join us in Gateway Library, Room 228 for “True or False? Uncovering Fake News” – a fun, family-friendly workshop on identifying fake news. This interactive session addresses the many faces of news today from the slightly misleading to the biased to the truly outrageous.

On Saturday, November 11, stop by between 3pm and 5pm in Fenwick Library, Room 1014B for “The Magical Art of Minicomics and Zines: a Quick Intro.” Ever wanted to make your own comic, but didn’t know where to start? What would you write about? How would you share it with other people? Come learn about minicomics and zines, two kinds of homemade or “do-it-yourself” publications. You’ll learn a few simple methods for folding and making 8-page booklets and ways to tell a story in eight short pages. This workshop is kid-friendly, drop-in, and hands on, so you can come and go as you like. Materials will be provided.

Since 2003, Mason has welcomed families to campus for Family Weekend with a variety of events that provide families the opportunity to connect, have fun, and make new memories. For more information and the full schedule, visit https://masonfamilyevents.gmu.edu/.

Jessica Clark

Mason Libraries are here for YOU

2 years 10 months ago

Are you taking advantage of the Mason Libraries’ numerous resources and activities? Don’t forget:

Need a break from studying and research? Like to read? Consider joining the Mason Libraries Book Club, or attending one of our upcoming special events:

  • Musical Rarities and Curiosities, Friday, November 3, 2pm Special Collections Research Center (Fenwick Library, Room 2400): Join Steven Gerber, Music Librarian, for an informal inspection of a dozen musical rarities acquired for Special Collections in the last year or two. These range from a 19th-century psalm setting in manuscript by Francesco Basili and costume designs for opera characters to the printed program of an 1850 Jenny Lind concert, a leaf from a medieval choir book, and limited-edition songs from Irving Berlin’s musical Top Hat.
  • Advances in Science 1586-1999: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants, Exhibition Reception, Tuesday, November 7, 3pm – 5pm, Special Collections Research Center (Fenwick Library, Room 2400): Visit SCRC to hear remarks about our current exhibit and enjoy refreshments generously provided by Argo Tea Café.
  • Music in the Lobby: Up Close + Classical, Wednesday, November 15, 1pm – 1:45pm: Join us in the Fenwick Lobby to hear the Mason Student Strings group perform selections by Bach and Dvorak. Refreshments generously provided by Argo Tea Café.
  • Mason Author Series: Patricia Donahue, Thursday, November 16, 3pm – 4:30pm, Fenwick Main Reading Room: Communities are the sum of myriad types of participation—positive, negative, formal, informal, direct, and indirect. Join us for a discussion with Patricia Donahue on her recent book, Participation, Community, and Public Policy in a Virginia Suburb, which challenges conventional wisdom about participation in modern American communities through the story of Northern Virginia’s Pimmit Hills.

Check out the Libraries calendar for more workshops and happenings, and visit our website to learn more about our resources and services!

Jessica Clark

Mason Author Series: Patricia Donahue

2 years 10 months ago

Join the University Libraries for our next Mason Author Series event on Thursday, November 16, at 3pm in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room (2001). Patricia Donahue will discuss her recent book, Participation, Community, and Public Policy in a Virginia Suburb.

Communities are the sum of myriad types of participation—positive, negative, formal, informal, direct, and indirect. Participation, Community, and Public Policy in a Virginia Suburb challenges conventional wisdom about participation in modern American communities through the story of Northern Virginia’s Pimmit Hills. Participation is much more than the activities, such as voting or attending religious services, tracked by social surveys. Pimmit Hills’s story will be familiar to those who grew up in middle-class suburbs, even as its proximity to Washington, D.C. makes its story unique.

About the Author: Patricia Farrell Donahue received her M.A. in public policy from Georgetown University and Ph.D. in public policy from George Mason University. She is the 2014 Recipient of Mason’s Robert L. Fisher Award for Best Dissertation and Academic Achievement. She has worked as a policy analyst in the federal government, on community and economic development, emergency management, and other topics. She also serves as a Policy Fellow at GMU’s Schar School of Government and Policy.

About the Mason Author Series: The University Libraries’ Mason Author Series features Mason faculty and alumni authors throughout the year, and is generously sponsored by the University Bookstore. For more information about the Mason Author Series, please contact John Warren, Head, Mason Publishing, jwarre13@gmu.edu, or Jessica Clark, Development & Communications Officer, jclarkw@gmu.edu.

Jessica Clark

Kirker Named “Up & Comer”

2 years 10 months ago

Congratulations to Maoria Kirker, Mason Libraries’ Instruction and Assessment Coordinator, recognized by the organizers of the annual Charleston Conference for her promising achievements and contributions to the library profession. Selected as one of twenty “Up & Comers”, Maoria will be profiled in the December/January issue of Against the Grain (ATG,) and will also be interviewed for an upcoming ATG Media podcast.

jconigli

Celebrate Mason Authors!

2 years 10 months ago

Fall for the Book may have concluded for this year, but the celebration of authors and writing continues in November with National Authors Day (November 1) and National Novel Writing Month (begun in 1999).

To celebrate, the Libraries will be highlighting some of our Mason authors throughout the month. We encourage you to join us by exploring some of these authors and titles as well. The Mason Spirit features recent faculty and alumni publications and profiles. To see which of these books are in the Libraries’ collection, check out our Faculty Author Collection by visiting bit.ly/masonauthors. If you post about your readings on social media use #NationalAuthorsDay.

And, don’t forget about the Libraries’ Mason Author Series, hosted throughout the year. Our next event will be held on Thursday, November 16 at 3pm in the Fenwick Main Reading Room (2001). Patricia Donahue will discuss her recent book, Participation, Community, and Public Policy in a Virginia Suburb.

Jessica Clark

Advances in Science Exhibit

2 years 10 months ago

Bioscience. Space Exploration. Engineering. Information Technology. These are but a few of the rapidly advancing fields of science which affect our modern lives. Achievements in these disciplines were built – and continue to build – upon discoveries made by preceding generations of scientists. As Sir Issac Newton famously wrote, “If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.”

The exhibit Advances in Science 1586 -1999 Standing on the Shoulders of Giants explores the layered nature of scientific research, in which new knowledge is gained over the framework of each new discovery. In this exhibit, we see how the scientific method, first advocated by Sir Francis Bacon, informed the methodology of naturalist, Charles Darwin and later, the scientists who discovered DNA, Watson and Crick. In the field of applied mathematics, the theories espoused by Euclid during the 3rd Century, B.C. created a system of mathematical thinking that would not be expanded until the 19th century. And even as applied mathematics advances and paradigms shift, the work of Euclid remains relevant.

This exhibition explores the evolution of scientific thought through rare books, archival documents, and photographs. It examines two main branches of science: the life sciences and applied mathematics. Featuring the works of Euclid, Bacon, Spallanzani, Pasteur, Linnaeus, and Darwin, Advances in Science 1586 -1999 Standing on the Shoulders of Giants spans the period between the formulation of the scientific method to the construction of the International Space Station. A reception will be held on November 7, 3-5 p.m., Special Collections Research Center, 2400 Fenwick Library.

For more information, please contact Rebecca Bramlett, rbramlet@gmu.edu, 703-933-2058.

 

jconigli

Hunsberger Receives University Award

2 years 11 months ago

Congratulations to Izzie Hunsberger, Reference, Instruction and Technology Specialist, Teaching & Learning Services, RES, who will receive the University’s Exceptional Support Award on November 2, 2017. The award ceremony will be held in Dewberry Hall, Johnson Center, at 10:30 a.m.

As stated on Mason’s Human Resources website, the Exceptional Support Award recognizes “employees who provide excellent support are the backbone of Mason; they provide the strength for their department and the University to grow and prosper. They are often the “go-to” person in their department providing excellent customer service and ensuring that the functions and operations of their department run smoothly.” Up to ten awards are given annually by Human Resources.

jconigli

Join Us at GRADReCon 2017

2 years 11 months ago

Bring a laptop – bring a friend! On Friday, October 27, 10:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m., Fenwick Library, build your productivity, research, and writing skills at GRADReCon 2017!  An array of workshops provide opportunities to learn new things and meet fellow grad students. GRADReCon is brought to you by Mason Libraries and Mason Grad Life.

The highlight of this year’s GRADReCon is the Plenary Lunch* with keynote speaker Dr. Peter Pober, who will present “Walking the Walk and Talking the Talk” (Communicating Your Research). You can also win Raffle Prizes! For current schedule and to register for the Plenary Lunch*, please visit the GRADReCon site.

*Plenary Lunch generously provided by SAGE Publications

jconigli

Research Poster Design Workshops

2 years 11 months ago

Do you have a poster presentation in your future? Mason Libraries offer Research Poster Design workshops to help you learn how to design and create a research poster for your next conference or class project. Topics include: getting started turning your research into a poster presentation, plus layout and design tips in PowerPoint and InDesign.

Workshops are offered by SP@RC staff. Workshop dates, times and locations are available at library.gmu.edu/workshops

 

jconigli

DiSC Supports Research Fellows

2 years 11 months ago

DiSC | 2700 Fenwick Library | dsc.gmu.edu

Two Mason faculty members were awarded 2017-18 Fenwick Fellowships which tap into the knowledge, resources and expertise offered through the Mason Libraries’ Digital Scholarship Center (DiSC). Jennifer Ashley, assistant professor of global affairs, and Alok Yadav, associate professor of English, will partner with DiSC on their respective Fenwick Fellow research projects.

“This is a digital project, which is not the skillset I bring to the table,” Professor Yadav said. “It’s in collaboration with the digital scholarship unit housed at the library. So the chance to draw on their expertise, to think about software structure and what it would look like, makes this a realizable project as opposed to a fantasy. I have ideas, but I don’t have the know-how to make that happen.” (Cruise, News at Mason, October 16, 2017) Read more

Established in 2016, Mason Libraries’ Digital Scholarship Center (DiSC) partners with students, faculty, and staff by providing digital research support to facilitate digital research and teaching across the university in all disciplines.

DiSC is located in 2700 Fenwick Library, Fairfax Campus. For more information about DiSC, please visit the DiSC website or contact DiSC staff.

jconigli

Film Festival: Focus on Human Trafficking

2 years 11 months ago

Join ArtWorks for Freedom, S-CAR, and the University Libraries on Wednesday, October 18 (on the Arlington campus), to learn about modern slavery and human trafficking. We will be showing two documentaries: The True Cost and Not My Life.

The True Cost, directed by Andrew Morgan, is a story about clothing – about the clothes we wear, the people who make them, and the impact the industry is having on our world. The price of clothing has been decreasing for decades, while the human and environmental costs have grown dramatically. The True Cost is a groundbreaking documentary film that pulls back the curtain on the untold story and asks us to consider, who really pays the price for our clothing?

Not My Life, directed by Robert Bilheimer and narrated by Glenn Close, depicts the horrifying and dangerous practices of human trafficking and modern slavery on a global scale. Filmed on 5 continents over a period of 4 years, combining testimony from survivors, opinion and analysis from their advocates with vivid depictions of the exploitation, Not My Life is a powerful indictment of the global trade in human beings and the abuse of vulnerable people.

WHEN: Wednesday, October 18, 12pm – 1:45pm OR 7:30pm – 10pm (both films will be shown at each viewing time).

WHERE: 5th floor, Vernon Smith Hall, Arlington Campus (within S-CAR space)

REGISTRATION: Please sign up at https://gmu.libcal.com/event/3628521. The event is free!

Jessica Clark

Veterans Look Back on the Cuban Missile Crisis

2 years 11 months ago

Join the University Libraries on Tuesday, October 24, at 2pm in the Fenwick Main Reading Room, for a special “Talking to History” event.

Martin J. Sherwin, University Professor of History, will moderate a panel discussion with four other veterans of the Cuban Missile Crisis: Ray Beery, Garrett Cochran, Eric D. Henderson, and Bob Persell. Our five guests have a range of experience among them – Air Force intelligence officer, Air Force captain, junior officer on a destroyer, and CIA agents – and will share their reflections and stories of this time. After the panel discussions, all attendees are invited to visit our Special Collections Research Center to view Cuban Missile Crisis-related items on display (including manuscript collections, publications, and an original U.S. civil defense film, Duck and Cover).

For more about the Cuban Missile Crisis, including audio from many national security meetings, visit the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum‘s online exhibit, “The World on the Brink – John F. Kennedy and the Cuban Missile Crisis: Thirteen Days in October 1962.”

About Martin J. Sherwin: Martin J. Sherwin is University Professor of History at George  Mason University. He joined the faculties of the History-Art History Department and the School of Public Policy in the Fall 2007. For 27 years prior to coming to GMU, he was the Walter S. Dickson Professor of English and American History at Tufts University. His 2005 book, American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer (with Kai Bird) won the 2006 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award for biography as well as the English Speaking Union Book Award among other awards.

Jessica Clark

Fall for the Book & Alumni Weekend

2 years 11 months ago

Fall means it is time for Fall for the Book and Alumni Weekend here at Mason, and the Libraries is participating with a number of events (please see below)!

Fall for the Book, the region’s oldest and largest celebration of literature, will take place October 11-14. The Mason Libraries is one of many sponsors supporting this annual festival, which will include such headliners as Colson Whitehead, Jennine Capo Crucet, Mohsin Hamid, Lev Grossman, Janet Mock, and Ellen Bryant Voigt. Jennine Capo Crucet is the author of this year’s Mason Reads selection, Make Your Home Among Strangers, and the Libraries is sponsoring her talk in the Concert Hall on Thursday, October 12 at 4:30pm. In addition, the Libraries will host events in our Fenwick Main Reading Room and Special Collections Research Center.

Alumni Weekend takes place October 12-15 this year. Haven’t been on campus in a while? Thinking about reconnecting with your Mason friends and former classmates? Join the Mason community for our annual Alumni Weekend! You can tour the campus, get together at the Green and Gold Bash, or attend any number of alumni events being held over the weekend. Haven’t seen the new Fenwick Library yet? Come visit us!

Call + Response 2017: Artists’ Panel, Fenwick Gallery Walkthrough
Wednesday, October 11, 3pm, Fenwick Main Reading Room

Call & Response is an annual exhibit of collaborations between writers and visual artists, in which one calls and one responds. The result is a dynamic set of paired works of words and artistic media that resonate and speak to contemporary issues. The theme for Call & Response 2017 is INVISIBLE, in conversation with Artworks for Freedom’s campaign to raise awareness about human trafficking. The visual artists and writers of Call & Response will interpret the theme of INVISIBLE as it relates to victims of “invisible crimes” or unlawful actions that go unnoticed. Call & Response is a collaboration of the School of Art, the English Department’s MFA program in Creative Writing, and University Libraries presented in conjunction with the annual Fall for the Book festival.

At the Margins: Invisibility and Marginalized Communities
Thursday, October 12, 2-4pm, 2400 Fenwick Library, Special Collections Research Center

For this month’s Artists’ Book Open House, we take on the theme of invisibility and present these works as an extension of the discussions happening around Artworks for Freedom, and Fenwick Gallery’s exhibition Call & Response. These artists’ books explore issues of marginalization and highlight the perspectives and voices of the “invisible,” those persons and communities at the edges of society and the victims of “invisible crimes.” Visitors will have an opportunity for hands-on interaction with these materials, and to learn how Mason students and researchers can use these materials as a source of visual, formal, and thematic inspiration.

Mason Author Series: Alumni Poetry
Friday, October 13, 4pm, Fenwick Main Reading Room

In conjunction with Fall for the Book and Alumni Weekend, we will welcome five alumni poets – Sarah Marcus (MFA ’12), Sheila McMullin (MFA ’13), Ranjani Murali (MFA ’10), Nicole Tong (MFA ’07), and Sarah Ann Winn (MFA ’14) – who will read from their latest works. The full Fall for the Book schedule is available at fallforthebook.org.

Alumni Weekend: SCRC Open House
Saturday, October 14, 10:30am-12pm, Special Collections Research Center

Come take a trip down Memory Lane with your fellow alumni: visit the all-new Fenwick Library and (re)experience Mason’s 60 years of history. See the building in Bailey’s Crossroads where George Mason opened in 1957; read the article you wrote for Broadside in 1977; chuckle over what you wore in the 1997 yearbook; look for the course description from your favorite class from 2007, and more. The display will also include historical highlights from each decade, making your history come alive.

Jessica Clark

Our Comics, Ourselves Closes Oct 6

2 years 11 months ago

TODAY: Spike Trotman and Ariell Johnson in Conversation
Tuesday, October 3, 6pm
The HUB Ballroom

C. “Spike” Troutman is an artist, cartoonist, bestselling writer, and founder of Iron Circus Comics in Chicago. Ariell Johnson is the owner and president of Amalgam Comics and Coffeehouse in Philadelphia. Join these two groundbreaking women of comics and learn more about their commitment to fostering innovative stories and unsung voices in comics.

We hope you’ve had a chance to visit the current exhibition, “Our Comics, Ourselves“, and participate in one of the many related events. If you haven’t, please come by Fenwick Library this week before the exhibition closes on Friday, October 6! To read more about the exhibit, visit our Fenwick Gallery site.

About “Our Comics, Ourselves”: Curated by Jan Descartes and Monica McKelvey Johnson, “Our Comics, Ourselves” includes comic books, graphic novels, DIY comics, and various comics paraphernalia primarily from the United States, from 1945 to present. The works range from autobiographical to sheer fantasy, and explore feminism, abortion, racism, cultural identity, social activism, labor unions, veterans of war, sexual abuse, student debt, immigration, public health, civil rights, gender and sexual identity, and more. “Our Comics, Ourselves” presents the graphic stories that describe the complexity and diversity of our collective experience, and examines the social and historical contexts within which they emerged. “Our Comics, Ourselves” is an independent traveling exhibition that originated at Interference Archive (Brooklyn, NY) in 2016, and is supported by faculty partners and departments across George Mason University.

Jessica Clark

Join us for Spirits in the Archives!

2 years 11 months ago

The arrival of October means it is American Archives Month! Since 2006, cultural institutions around the United States have hosted annual events to spread the word about what archives are and the important role archivists play in preserving and presenting history.

The Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center (SCRC) will be holding an archives information session today, October 3 from 1pm-4pm: just stop by their display in the Fenwick Library Atrium to learn more. October 4 is AskAnArchivist day: SCRC will be active on their various social media accounts to help answer any questions you may have about archives, archivists, and anything else archives-related.

SCRC is also participating in the REMIX contest organized by the Virginia Caucus of Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference and invites you to join them by creating your own submissions. The REMIX “Spirits in the Archives” is a contest to inspire literal and figurative out-of-the-box ideas for cultural heritage collections, such as creating redaction poetry, GIFs, collages, coloring pages, memes, and other digital interventions.

Finally, to close out October, SCRC will host an  Archives Month Open House on October 31 from 1pm-4pm to display some of our collections related to the theme of Spirits in the Archives and to feature REMIX contest submissions.

For more information about American Archives Month, the REMIX context, SCRC’s Mason Archives Month contest, some fun images from SCRC’s collections, and SCRC’s vital role in archiving and preserving history, please read SCRC’s informative blog post over at Vault217.

Jessica Clark

Reception & Curator’s Talk Tonight!

3 years ago

Our Comics, Ourselves is officially underway! Join us as we host artists, writers, comics shop owners, and the exhibition’s curators throughout the month of September and early October. All are welcome to join us this evening for:

Curator’s Talk, Opening Reception, and Print Shop Jam
Friday, September 14, 6:00pm
Fenwick Library Main Reading Room / Mason School of Art

Jan Descartes (she/her) and Monica McKelvey Johnson (she/her) will give a curator’s talk on the latest iteration of the traveling exhibition, Our Comics, Ourselves, which originated at Interference Archive in Brooklyn, NY. Focusing on themes of authorship and identity, they will talk about the major works on view, and discuss the process of organizing Our Comics, Ourselves through their method of feminist curating. The presentation will be followed by an open discussion.

Event to be followed by an opening reception and comics and printmaking jam at the Mason School of Art, beginning at 7:30pm.

A sign language interpreter will be present at this event.

This presentation is part of Our Comics, Ourselves: Identity, Expression, and Representation in Comic Art, on display now through October 6 at Fenwick Gallery. Visit http://fenwickgallery.gmu.edu/exhibits/our-comics-ourselves/ for more details.

About the curators: Jan Descartes is a Brooklyn-based artist, educator and curator. She is a graduate of Syracuse University (BA), Carnegie Melon University (MFA) and anticipated graduate of CUNY Graduate Center, with a degree focus on Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies (MLS). She currently co-curates the Our Comics, Ourselves exhibition with Monica McKelvey Johnson, which focuses on identity and representation. Through her artistic, academic and professional life, art and accessibility has been a major theme, culminating in her current thesis regarding trauma and memory in public aesthetic spaces. Jan is co-creator and artist for the webcomic Heartland Comic, where personal memoir and identity politics meet comix. She is currently involved with planning/organizing outreach projects in NYC, where she hopes to facilitate DIY comic-making as an accessible means to explore personal experience and resistance in the everyday. She also lives with a sweet dog and an angry cat.

Monica McKelvey Johnson is a comic artist, writer, and curator living in Brooklyn. She is a graduate of San Francisco State University (BA), and CUNY Hunter College’s Integrated Media Arts Program (MFA). She authored the web comic The Adventures of Dorrit Little, a story about the average student debtor in the United States today, and founded the student debtor support group, EDU Debtors Union. She writes about comics from an intersectional feminist perspective for The Rumpus and The Comics Journal, and has co-organized several exhibitions at Interference Archive—including Our Comics, Ourselves,Take Back the Fight: Resisting Sexual Violence from the Ground Up, and an upcoming exhibition focusing on Deaf culture. She is a practitioner of “feminist curation,” a methodology she continues to develop with Jan Descartes.

Jessica Clark

Mason Author Series: Free Speech and Unfree News

3 years ago

Join the University Libraries for our next Mason Author Series event, featuring a discussion with Sam Lebovic, Assistant Professor of History, about his recent book, Free Speech and Unfree News: The Paradox of Press Freedom in America. The reading and discussion will take place at 3pm on Thursday, October 5 in the Fenwick Library’s Main Reading Room (Room 2001).

About Free Speech and Unfree News: Does America have a free press? Many who answer yes appeal to First Amendment protections that shield the press from government censorship. But in this comprehensive history of American press freedom as it has existed in theory, law, and practice, Sam Lebovic shows that, on its own, the right of free speech has been insufficient to guarantee a free press.

Lebovic recovers a vision of press freedom, prevalent in the mid-twentieth century, based on the idea of unfettered public access to accurate information. This “right to the news” responded to persistent worries about the quality and diversity of the information circulating in the nation’s news. Yet as the meaning of press freedom was contested in various arenas—Supreme Court cases on government censorship, efforts to regulate the corporate newspaper industry, the drafting of state secrecy and freedom of information laws, the unionization of journalists, and the rise of the New Journalism—Americans chose to define freedom of the press as nothing more than the right to publish without government censorship. The idea of a public right to all the news and information was abandoned, and is today largely forgotten.

Free Speech and Unfree News compels us to reexamine assumptions about what freedom of the press means in a democratic society—and helps us make better sense of the crises that beset the press in an age of aggressive corporate consolidation in media industries, an increasingly secretive national security state, and the daily newspaper’s continued decline.

About the Author: Sam Lebovic is Assistant Professor of History at George Mason University, where he directs the PhD program in History and serves as associate editor of the Journal of Social History. He is the author of Free Speech and Unfree News: The Paradox of Press Freedom in America (Harvard, 2016), which was awarded the 2017 Ellis W. Hawley Prize by the Organization of American Historians, and was a finalist for the 2016 Frank Luther Mott award. His research focuses on the history of American politics, culture, and media, and has been supported by fellowships from the American Society for Legal History, the NYU Center for the Cold War and the US, the Center for Cultural Analysis at Rutgers, the Truman Library Institute, and the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. Lebovic’s essays and articles have been published in Diplomatic History, the Journal of Social History, the Journal of American Studies, the Columbia Journalism Review, the Los Angeles Review of Books, the Boston GlobePolitico, and other journals and edited volumes.  He teaches courses on a wide range of subjects in modern American and global history, and is currently researching the mid-century history of cultural globalization.

About the Mason Author Series: The University Libraries’ Mason Author Series features Mason faculty and alumni authors throughout the year, and is generously sponsored by the University Bookstore. For more information about the Mason Author Series, please contact John Warren, Head, Mason Publishing, jwarre13@gmu.edu, or Jessica Clark, Development & Communications Officer, jclarkw@gmu.edu.

Jessica Clark

Records Management Workshops

3 years ago

University Records Center Update: The University Records Center, which was closed in July and August for renovations, has re-opened. Have records to store or dispose? Check out the Records Management website for more information or RSVP for one of our upcoming training workshops.

University Records Management Training: Questions about managing your physical and electronic records? Join University Records Management for a 2-hour training session, bring your questions, and pick up boxes for records storage. Training sessions will be hosted from 10am to 12pm in the Special Collections Research Seminar Room (Fenwick Library 2400) on September 15, October 20, November 17, and December 15. Please RSVP at recmgt@gmu.edu as seating is limited.

About University Records Management: University Records Management assists with the retention and disposal of non-permanent university records regardless of format. It minimizes the space, equipment, and personnel required to store and maintain records. Records Management assists with the timely disposal of records in full compliance with university policy, state retention requirements, and federal law. For more information, see this blog post on “The Difference Between Archiving and Records Management.”

Jessica Clark
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