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Women to Watch

American University News - Thu, 04/12/2018 - 00:00
With the Inauguration of American University’s first female President, we celebrate eight incredible women who have made their mark at SPExS and beyond.
Categories: University News

CAS Student Research Winners Announced

American University News - Thu, 04/12/2018 - 00:00
College of Arts and Sciences undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students presented their original scholarly and creative works at the 28th annual Robyn Mathias Student Research Conference.
Categories: University News

National Experts Gather at AU School of Public Affairs to Discuss ‘Politics of Truth’

American University News - Thu, 04/12/2018 - 00:00
Perceptions of factual reality increasingly come in partisan shades of red and blue. To better understand this phenomenon, SPA recently hosted a forum called “The Politics of Truth.”
Categories: University News

Mason Author Series: Bryan Caplan

George Mason University - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 11:06

Join us for our last Mason Author Series event of the spring semester on Thursday, May 3, at 3 p.m. in the Fenwick Main Reading Room. Our featured faculty author is Bryan Caplan, who will be discussing his recent book, The Case Against Education.

In this explosive book, Bryan Caplan argues that the primary function of education is not to enhance students’ skill but to certify their intelligence, work ethic, and conformity—in other words, to signal the qualities of a good employee. Learn why students hunt for easy As and casually forget most of what they learn after the final exam, why decades of growing access to education have not resulted in better jobs for the average worker but instead in runaway credential inflation, how employers reward workers for costly schooling they rarely if ever use, and why cutting education spending is the best remedy.

Caplan draws on the latest social science to show how the labor market values grades over knowledge, and why the more education your rivals have, the more you need to impress employers. He explains why graduation is our society’s top conformity signal, and why even the most useless degrees can certify employability. He advocates two major policy responses. The first is educational austerity. Government needs to sharply cut education funding to curb this wasteful rat race. The second is more vocational education, because practical skills are more socially valuable than teaching students how to outshine their peers.

Books will be available for purchase at the event, and refreshments will be provided.

About the Author: Bryan Caplan is professor of economics at George Mason University and a blogger at EconLog. He is the author of Selfish Reasons to Have More Kids: Why Being a Great Parent Is Less Work and More Fun than You Think and The Myth of the Rational Voter: Why Democracies Choose Bad Policies (Princeton).

About the Mason Author Series: The University Libraries’ Mason Author Series features Mason faculty and alumni authors throughout the year, and is generously sponsored by the University Bookstore. For more information about the Mason Author Series, please contact John Warren, Head, Mason Publishing, jwarre13@gmu.edu.

Categories: University News

WRLC Newsletter, April 2018

WRLC Newsletter - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 08:00



Through the Valley of Death: A Student's Exploration of Police Brutality

American University News - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 00:00
MFA student Sid Dawnson III's uncle died while in police custody in 2000. He explores his uncle's death in a documentary film, years later.
Categories: University News

Ford Foundation President Talks About Justice and Opportunity for All

American University News - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 00:00
Ford Foundation President Darren Walker told faculty and students at American University on April 4 that addressing growing inequality in the world is his organization’s top priority.
Categories: University News

Elizabeth Suhay’s New Research Examines Attitudes on Gay Rights

American University News - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 00:00
Does changing a person’s mind about the origins of sexual orientation actually influence a person’s attitudes toward LGBTQ citizens and policies that affect them? New research by SPA Assistant Professor Elizabeth Suhay’s tackled this question.
Categories: University News

Six Pilot Projects Selected for Inclusive Excellence Mini-Grants

American University News - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 00:00
Each project will tackle the advancement of diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts at AU.
Categories: University News

AU Set to Inaugurate Sylvia M. Burwell as 15th President

American University News - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 00:00
American University will celebrate the inauguration of Sylvia Mathews Burwell as AU's 15th and first female president on Thursday, April 12, in Bender Arena.
Categories: University News

AU Establishes Working Group on the Influence of Slavery

American University News - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 00:00
Drawing from the perspectives of students and faculty experts, the group will explore questions about whether slavery impacted AU's founding.
Categories: University News

Whitesplaining on Facebook: PhD Student Donte Newman Looks at Race and Social Media

American University News - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 00:00
Newman is in the communication doctoral program, focusing on media, technology, and democracy.
Categories: University News

Trump national security staff merry-go-round reflects decades of policy competition and conflict

American University News - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 00:00
As President Trump’s third National Security Advisor starts work in the White House, Professor Emeritus Gordon Adams explains why it’s not always clear who runs US national security policy in any administration.
Categories: University News

Fenwick Fellow Lectures: April 25

George Mason University - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 10:17

Join the University Libraries on Wednesday, April 25 at 2 p.m. in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room, when Professors Edward Rhodes and John Turner will discuss their research findings from their 2016-2017 fellowships.

Edward Rhodes, Professor, Government & International Affairs, Schar School of Policy & Government

Lecture Title:  “Normalcy”: Rediscovering the Curious Brilliance of Warren G. Harding

Abstract: Dismissed by biographers as an intellectual nullity, mocked by critics for what H.L. Mencken famously described as his “Gamalielese” prose, and remembered in history texts principally for his notably corrupt Secretary of the Interior and for his illegitimate daughter, Warren G. Harding has escaped serious academic scrutiny, living on largely as an easy target for late-night comedians. Harding’s own writings –which were generally in the form of speeches – have gone not only unread but uncollected. For the most part they are, even in this time of widespread digitization, extremely difficult to locate or to access. This is unfortunate because a close reading of Harding reveals not only a clear, sophisticated, and internally consistent vision of America but a deep understanding of the challenges facing a liberal, democratic republic in a period of rapid economic and social change. Forgotten, too, is the fact that Harding was, in his three years in office, extraordinarily successful in advancing his policy agenda, particularly in the realm of foreign policy. Even more interesting, however, is how strongly some of the key elements in Harding’s vision and strategic approach resonate in today’s world.

John Turner, Associate Professor, Religious Studies, College of Humanities & Social Sciences

Lecture Title:  Plymouth Colony and the Making of American Liberty

Abstract: Over the last two centuries, Americans have celebrated “the Pilgrims” as the progenitors of democracy and liberty. At the same time, the Mayflower leaders and their successors in Plymouth Colony imprisoned, tortured, and expelled religious and political dissenters. Were the Pilgrims rank hypocrites, denying others the freedom they desired for themselves? The answer is more complicated. The Pilgrims had a very specific understanding of “Christian liberty,” which essentially meant an obligation to have church according to their understanding of the Bible. While their leaders did not favor a broader “freedom of religion,” Plymouth Colony was riven by debates over the meaning and extent of liberty over its seventy year history.

About the Fenwick Fellows: The Fenwick Fellowship is awarded annually to Mason faculty member(s) to pursue research project(s) that use and enhance the University Libraries’ resources while advancing knowledge in the faculty members’ field. Applications for the 2018-2019 fellowship are currently being accepted; the deadline is May 7, 2018.

Categories: University News

Peace Corps and SIS: Communities of service

American University News - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 00:00
In celebration of SIS’s 60th anniversary, we explore the longstanding relationship between SIS and the Peace Corps and their shared commitment to service and peace.
Categories: University News

Three minutes on empathy and conflict prevention

American University News - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 00:00
Ethics, Peace, and Global Affairs student Abrar A. Rageh, SIS/MA ’18, reflects on her first-place win at recent national competition, in which she presented empathy as a tool for conflict prevention research in under three minutes.
Categories: University News

AU Teaches DC High School Students Innovation and Entrepreneurship Fundamentals

American University News - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 00:00
AU brought students from DC’s Woodson STEM High School to campus, giving them an introduction to product development, innovation, and customer discovery.
Categories: University News

Professor Aufderheide to Testify at Library of Congress

American University News - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 00:00
Patricia Aufderheide, University Professor in the American University School of Communication (AU SOC), will testify at the Library of Congress part of hearings on the topic of Digital Millennium Copyright Act exemptions which will run April 10-12.
Categories: University News

Explore Global Perspectives during iWeek

George Mason University - Fri, 04/06/2018 - 10:06

Mason’s annual International Week takes place from Friday, April 6 until Sunday, April 15, 2018.

Mason Libraries is committed to exploring global perspectives! One way the Libraries achieves this is by acquiring a variety of online resources for students, faculty and staff to help them learn, teach, and succeed. Resources include a wide array of foreign language resources, ranging from books, e-books, scholarly journals, juvenile literaturemusic and movies. Use Quick Search, the Libraries’ CatalogSubject Guides, or the Database List to browse, locate and use the materials.

Explore these resources and more with the Mason Libraries!

Categories: University News

Diversity and Professional Development Defined International Communication Program, Says Alumna

American University News - Fri, 04/06/2018 - 00:00
Sarah Medeiros is Assistant for Communications and External Affairs at the National Women's Law Center in DC.
Categories: University News

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