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GW Libraries: News and Updates
Updated: 3 min 24 sec ago

Memorial Day Weekend Hours

Tue, 05/20/2014 - 15:05
May 20, 2014

In observance of the Memorial Day holiday, Gelman Library will be closed on Sunday, May 25 and Monday, May 26. 

Saturday, May 24 - closing at 6 pm
Sunday, May 25 - CLOSED
Monday, May 26 - CLOSED
Tuesday, May 27 - opening at 7:30am

 

 

In Memoriam: Dr. Samuel Halperin

Tue, 05/13/2014 - 13:59
May 13, 2014

The GW Libraries are saddened by the passing of Dr. Samuel Halperin, a longtime member of the GW Libraries Development Advisory Council and benefactor of our Special Collections,including the Kiev Judaica Collection. Dr. Halperin was a true partner in helping us develop in stature as a university library. He valued education and research resources at every level. His love of learning was apparent in all his professional and volunteer endeavors. He will be sorely missed.

Read more about Dr. Samuel Halperin and his impact on access to public education and national education policy in the Washington Post article celebrating his life. 

 

led George Washington University's Institute for Education Leadership from 1969-81 - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/washingtonpost/obituary.aspx?n=samuel-h...

Labor History Research Center Hosts Progressive Student Union Program on Wage Theft

Tue, 05/06/2014 - 08:36

The Teamsters Labor History Research Center hosted a Progressive Student Union program on wage theft on April 24, 2014.

Project background: Social Feed Manager

Mon, 05/05/2014 - 11:00
May 5, 2014Daniel Chudnov, Director, Scholarly Technology

Not long after I joined GW Libraries I read about the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism study "How Mainstream Media Outlets Use Twitter" researched in part by Kimberly Gross of GWU's School of Media and Public Affairs, part of the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences. This work caught my interest because I had been swimming in Twitter data in my prior position, where I had supported the Library of Congress project to preserve all public tweets. Before I came to GW, I enjoyed working on that large project because of its long-term impact, but it was clear that in the short term our team was unable to respond to the hundreds of requests for access to historical Twitter data from researchers all over. And here was a GW researcher getting important work done with some of the same data - I had to know more.

I reached out to Professor Gross and learned quickly upon meeting with her that her data collection techniques were essentially manual - she and her research assistants were copying and pasting tweets one at a time. We agreed this wasn't a sustainable model, and I offered to develop a small app that would automate the collection process using Twitter's public API. After making some progress on this app and reviewing it with Professor Gross, it became clear that there were many more opportunities to put a tool like our app -- rudimentary though it was at the time -- to use in other research contexts on campus. She introduced us to colleagues doing similar work and all of a sudden we had several new connections with faculty and graduate students to support their research and studies.  This aligns well with a key role libraries have always served, in our case connecting people at GW with information resources and facilitating their use.  In this case we are automating data collection from Twitter, or Weibo, or YouTube, but that's just a new take on the kind of relationship we've always worked to build in research libraries.

Not long after this, our colleague Mark Phillips, assistant dean for digital libraries at the University of North Texas, visited GW Libraries to talk about web archiving and pointed out to us that this project, which we called "Social Feed Manager" (that's what it does, after all - find it on github at https://github.com/gwu-libraries/social-feed-manager), was something that other institutions like his could put to good use. Mark encouraged us to apply for an Sparks Ignition Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. We took this advice to heart, sent in a proposal, and were lucky to be awarded a grant from IMLS (#LG-46-13-0257) in the summer of 2013. As the first grant we've received for software development, we're still pretty excited about it. More importantly, in the months since, we've made several improvements to the app, put it to use with more researchers and students here at GW, and started to see its adoption at other institutions.

As we wrote in the proposal abstract (attached here as a PDF), with this grant "we will develop our prototype Social Feed Manager application into a well-documented tool that can be implemented and used at diverse cultural heritage institutions." We've been making progress toward this goal and we plan to tell you a lot more about it, so please stay tuned to this channel, as they say, and don't hesitate to get in touch.

Files:  20130717-imls-sparks-abstract-final.pdf

End of Semester Hours

Thu, 05/01/2014 - 11:34
May 1, 2014

Tuesday, May 13:  
The 24-hour study ends & the library will close at midnight.  24-hour access will not resume until the Fall 2014 semester.

Wednesday, May 14- Friday, May 16:  
7:30 am - 7pm

Saturday, May 17 & Sunday, May 18:  
Noon - 6 pm

Summer hours begin on Monday, May 19
 
Remember, all of our online resources are available 24 hours a day to our current students, faculty and staff.

May Collection of the Month: Kelly Photographs of Washington

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 10:04

Special Collections is home to a remarkable D.C.

New Study Carrels on the 3rd Floor!

Tue, 04/29/2014 - 11:26
April 29, 2014

Gelman has added 120 new study carrels to the 3rd floor just in time for Final exams.  Each carrel comes with its own outlet! 

If you're looking for the tables, they've found a new home on the 1st floor.

Finals are Sweet at Cafe Gelman

Tue, 04/29/2014 - 11:19
April 29, 2014

Cafe Gelman!
Sunday, May 4
9-10pm
Gelman, Room 219

Join Program Board to refuel for Finals with drinks, candy and special treats.

Enter to Win The Eckles Prize

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 08:34
April 28, 2014

Do you feel like you put way too much work into that UW paper to just submit it and be done?  Did you take a class in your prospective major that required a research paper you found really interesting?  You should enter that paper to win the Eckles Prize for Freshman Research Excellence.

The Eckles Prize is awarded to a freshman for a research project that shows significant and meaningful use of the resources and services available at the George Washington University libraries.

First year students are encouraged to submit a research project of any length or format, as well as an essay summarizing how library resources were used to complete that project.  Students should enter the one project that they feel reflects their best work of the year.

If the recognition of winning the Eckles Prize isn't enough to entice you, maybe the prizes awarded to the top 3 submissions will:

    1st Place: $500
    2nd Place: $300
    3rd Place: $200

Deadline to Apply: Friday, May 16th, 2014

Submit all entries electronically to: ecklesprize@gmail.com
Be sure to submit your paper as a word document, as PDFs will not be accepted.

A complete application will include the following:

    Application cover sheet
    Research project
    2-3 page Reflection essay (double-spaced, 12 point font)
    Faculty support form (found on the main website)

To Apply go to the website below to view the official instructions and criteria.
http://library.gwu.edu/eckles/the-eckles-prize-for-freshman-research-excellence

A selection of previous winning papers can be found at http://library.gwu.edu/eckles/the-eckles-prize-for-freshman-research-excellence/winners.

Winners will be announced in late summer.  Winning students will present their papers during an awards ceremony in the fall.

Email any questions to ecklesprize@gmail.com.

Enter to Win The Eckles Prize

Mon, 04/28/2014 - 08:34
April 28, 2014

Do you feel like you put way too much work into that UW paper to just submit it and be done?  Did you take a class in your prospective major that required a research paper you found really interesting?  You should enter that paper to win the Eckles Prize for Freshman Research Excellence.

The Eckles Prize is awarded to a freshman for a research project that shows significant and meaningful use of the resources and services available at the George Washington University libraries.

First year students are encouraged to submit a research project of any length or format, as well as an essay summarizing how library resources were used to complete that project.  Students should enter the one project that they feel reflects their best work of the year.

If the recognition of winning the Eckles Prize isn't enough to entice you, maybe the prizes awarded to the top 3 submissions will:

    1st Place: $500
    2nd Place: $300
    3rd Place: $200

Deadline to Apply: Friday, May 16th, 2014

Submit all entries electronically to: ecklesprize@gmail.com
Be sure to submit your paper as a word document, as PDFs will not be accepted.

A complete application will include the following:

    Application cover sheet
    Research project
    2-3 page Reflection essay (double-spaced, 12 point font)
    Faculty support form (found on the main website)

To Apply go to the website below to view the official instructions and criteria.
http://library.gwu.edu/eckles/the-eckles-prize-for-freshman-research-excellence

A selection of previous winning papers can be found at http://library.gwu.edu/eckles/the-eckles-prize-for-freshman-research-excellence/winners.

Winners will be announced in late summer.  Winning students will present their papers during an awards ceremony in the fall.

Email any questions to ecklesprize@gmail.com.

Rolling Gelman Public Computer Outage at 2am Tonight

Fri, 04/25/2014 - 11:31
April 25, 2014

The GW Division of Information Technology will be performing a security update from 2-6am Saturday morning (tonight).  Public PC computers will be unavailable in Gelman during this maintenance. Please use Macs in The Lab and on the Entrance Floor during this outage.

In Memoriam: Phyllis Palmer

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 09:44
April 24, 2014

GW Libraries join the rest of our community in celebrating the life of Phyllis Palmer, Professor Emeritus of American Studies and Women's Studies.

In her 32 years at the university, she directed both the Women's Studies program and the American Studies department and was instrumental in the success they enjoy today. Her dedication to social justice, as a thinker and as an instructor, enriched the scholarly life of GW, both for her students and her colleagues.

An obituary from the Department of American Studies and the Columbian College can be found here, and below is a selected list of Professor Palmer's academic publications, with link (where available) to online versions accessible to GW faculty, staff, and students.

2008. Living as equals: How three white communities struggled to make interracial connections during the civil rights era. Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press. In Gelman.

2000. Recognizing racial privilege: White girls and boys at National Conference of Christians and Jews summer camps, 1957-1974. The Oral History Review 27 (2) (Summer 2000): 129-55. Online.

With Margery Mazie, Mayuris Pimentel, Sharon Rogers, Stuart Ruderfer, and Melissa Sokolowski. 1993. To deconstruct race, deconstruct whitenessAmerican Quarterly 45 (2) (June 1993): 281-294. Online.

1989. Domesticity and dirt :Housewives and domestic servants in the united states, 1920-1945. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. In Gelman.

With Roberta Spalter-Roth. 1987. Gender practices and employment : The sears case and the issue of "choice". Vol. 1987-3. Washington, D.C.: Graduate Institute for Policy Education and Research, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, George Washington University. In Gelman.

1983. White Women/Black women: The dualism of female identity and experience in the United States. Feminist Studies 9 (1) (Spring 1983): 151. Online.

1983. The racial feminization of poverty: Women of color as portents of the future for all women. Women's Studies Quarterly. 11 (3) (Fall 1983): 4-6. Online.

With Sharon L. Grant 1979. The status of clerical workers : A summary analysis of research findings and trends, with bibliography. Washington: Women's Studies Program, George Washington University. In Gelman.

In Memoriam: Phyllis Palmer

Thu, 04/24/2014 - 09:44
April 24, 2014

GW Libraries join the rest of our community in celebrating the life of Phyllis Palmer, Professor Emeritus of American Studies and Women's Studies.

In her 32 years at the university, she directed both the Women's Studies program and the American Studies department and was instrumental in the success they enjoy today. Her dedication to social justice, as a thinker and as an instructor, enriched the scholarly life of GW, both for her students and her colleagues.

An obituary from the Department of American Studies and the Columbian College can be found here, and below is a selected list of Professor Palmer's academic publications, with link (where available) to online versions accessible to GW faculty, staff, and students.

2008. Living as equals: How three white communities struggled to make interracial connections during the civil rights era. Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press. In Gelman.

2000. Recognizing racial privilege: White girls and boys at National Conference of Christians and Jews summer camps, 1957-1974. The Oral History Review 27 (2) (Summer 2000): 129-55. Online.

With Margery Mazie, Mayuris Pimentel, Sharon Rogers, Stuart Ruderfer, and Melissa Sokolowski. 1993. To deconstruct race, deconstruct whitenessAmerican Quarterly 45 (2) (June 1993): 281-294. Online.

1989. Domesticity and dirt :Housewives and domestic servants in the united states, 1920-1945. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. In Gelman.

With Roberta Spalter-Roth. 1987. Gender practices and employment : The sears case and the issue of "choice". Vol. 1987-3. Washington, D.C.: Graduate Institute for Policy Education and Research, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, George Washington University. In Gelman.

1983. White Women/Black women: The dualism of female identity and experience in the United States. Feminist Studies 9 (1) (Spring 1983): 151. Online.

1983. The racial feminization of poverty: Women of color as portents of the future for all women. Women's Studies Quarterly. 11 (3) (Fall 1983): 4-6. Online.

With Sharon L. Grant 1979. The status of clerical workers : A summary analysis of research findings and trends, with bibliography. Washington: Women's Studies Program, George Washington University. In Gelman.

Capturing Watergate: The place and story

Wed, 04/23/2014 - 17:02
April 23, 2014

Saturday, April 26
11am
Gelman Library, Room 702
Light refreshments

Join author & GW professor Thomas Mallon for a discussion of the historical details and geography that bring his award-winning fiction to life.  After the talk, download the “DC By the Book” app to participate in a self-guided walking tour of fiction set in Foggy Bottom.

Capturing Watergate: The place and story

Wed, 04/23/2014 - 17:02
April 23, 2014

Saturday, April 26
11am
Gelman Library, Room 702
Light refreshments

Join author & GW professor Thomas Mallon for a discussion of the historical details and geography that bring his award-winning fiction to life.  After the talk, download the “DC By the Book” app to participate in a self-guided walking tour of fiction set in Foggy Bottom.

Celebrating GW's Faculty Authors

Tue, 04/15/2014 - 15:10
April 15, 2014

On Tuesday, May 13, from 3-5pm the GW Libraries will host a Celebration of Faculty Authors. If you are a faculty member and have published a significant work since Jan. 1, 2013, please email the citation to gelman@gwu.edu, so that we may honor your accomplishments.

As the hub of the university's intellectual life, not only does the library furnish the materials of scholarly research, but it also distributes the fruits of that research to the university community and the wider world, making today's intellectual work available for generations to come. As part of our stewardship of faculty publications, we want to recognize those faculty who have published a significant work in the past year.  

Have you authored a monograph, journal article, or refereed conference paper? Edited an anthology, a scholarly edition, or collection of essays? Authored a substantial creative or popular work? Has this work appeared in print or online since Jan. 1, 2013? Recognizing that disciplinary conventions, as well as personal and professional commitments, make it difficult to define "significant" in a universal way, we invite faculty, deans, and department chairs to identify the work -- whether their own or by their peers -- that deserves special acknowledgment. Those authors will be invited to a reception hosted by Geneva Henry, the University Librarian and Vice-Provost of GW Libraries and C. Dianne Martin, Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs.  

We welcome your suggestions as to how to improve this process. By highlighting the intellectual work of faculty across the disciplines, we aim to foster cross-disciplinary collaboration and innovation, as well as to say thanks for a job well done.

Celebrating GW's Faculty Authors

Tue, 04/15/2014 - 15:10
April 15, 2014

On Tuesday, May 13, from 3-5pm the GW Libraries will host a Celebration of Faculty Authors. If you are a faculty member and have published a significant work since Jan. 1, 2013, please email the citation to gelman@gwu.edu, so that we may honor your accomplishments.

As the hub of the university's intellectual life, not only does the library furnish the materials of scholarly research, but it also distributes the fruits of that research to the university community and the wider world, making today's intellectual work available for generations to come. As part of our stewardship of faculty publications, we want to recognize those faculty who have published a significant work in the past year.  

Have you authored a monograph, journal article, or refereed conference paper? Edited an anthology, a scholarly edition, or collection of essays? Authored a substantial creative or popular work? Has this work appeared in print or online since Jan. 1, 2013? Recognizing that disciplinary conventions, as well as personal and professional commitments, make it difficult to define "significant" in a universal way, we invite faculty, deans, and department chairs to identify the work -- whether their own or by their peers -- that deserves special acknowledgment. Those authors will be invited to a reception hosted by Geneva Henry, the University Librarian and Vice-Provost of GW Libraries and C. Dianne Martin, Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs.  

We welcome your suggestions as to how to improve this process. By highlighting the intellectual work of faculty across the disciplines, we aim to foster cross-disciplinary collaboration and innovation, as well as to say thanks for a job well done.

New Furniture Coming to the 3rd Floor

Fri, 04/11/2014 - 09:03
April 11, 2014

Gelman will add 120 new study carrels (with outlets!) to the 3rd floor before Final exams begin! 

Weekdays April 18-25 between 6am-2:30pm there will be some disruption to the 3rd floor while old furniture is removed and new furniture is installed.

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