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GW Libraries: News and Updates
Updated: 1 hour 12 min ago

Hey Corcoran! Meet GW Libraries.

Sun, 08/17/2014 - 12:27
August 17, 2014

Hey Corcoran! Meet GW Libraries
Tuesday, August 26 at 3:30pm
Gelman Library, Room 302

New students of the Corcoran School of the Arts & Design are invited to a special orientation to the GW Libraries. Get to know the collections, technology and services available to you at the GW Libraries.  Find out how to access research help, how to reserve a study room and see our awesome Multimedia Lab.

Stick around for burgers, hot dogs, and some knowledge at Librarypalooza, a casual cookout in Kogan Plaza from 4-6pm.

 

Student Jobs at Gelman Library

Thu, 08/14/2014 - 12:28
August 14, 2014

Where can you learn the research skills you need to snag that White House internship AND get paid doing it? Gelman Library!

Gelman is hiring work-study students able to work 5-10 hours/week.  No experience is required!

You can learn more at the Gelman Hiring Fair on move-in Saturday (August 23) from 1-3pm on the Gelman Entrance Floor -or- at Librarypalooza.  You can also apply by emailing a completed GW Student Job Application.pdf and your resume to gelman@gwu.edu or bringing it to the GW Libraries HR Department in Gelman, Suite 606 (Monday through Friday between 9am-5pm).

 

Files:  GW Student Job Application.pdf

Librarypalooza!

Mon, 08/11/2014 - 14:30
August 11, 2014

Librarypalooza!
Tuesday, August 26
4-6pm
Gelman Entrance Floor & Kogan Plaza

Join us for Librarypalooza, a casual cookout where graduate and undergraduate students can learn about library services and spaces in a relaxed environment.

Come to the Gelman Library's entrance floor to learn about everything you need to start your academic year off right - from checking out a book to choosing your library study space to getting research help and discovering resources in your discipline. Then, head to Kogan Plaza for burgers and hot dogs.

Rain date: Wednesday, August 27 from 4-6pm

Library Services for GW Faculty: An Orientation

Mon, 08/04/2014 - 11:41
August 4, 2014

Tuesday, August 19 at 10 am -or-
Thursday, August 21 at 9 am

Learn about course reserves, Interlibrary Loan, remote access to journals and databases, and other library services at GW. Discover how librarians can help you by obtaining materials for our library collections, providing research instruction for your students, and consulting with you about your own research. Talk with librarians and library staff about the resources available for your research and teaching.

Each workshop will last about an hour, with plenty of time for your questions. Sign up now at go.gwu.edu/1qr to reserve your space! 

Start Smart: Graduate Student Library Orientations

Fri, 08/01/2014 - 11:40
August 1, 2014

Start your graduate career off right by attending a library orientation!  Learn about GW Libraries, and its collections, and discover resources in your discipline.  Tours will be offered at the end of the session.

Five orientation sessions are available:
Friday, August 15  from 11am - 12pm
Friday, August 22  from 2 - 3pm, 3 - 4pm, 4 - 5pm or 5 - 6pm

Please RSVP at go.gwu.edu/LibStart

 

 

 

Planned Transfer of Library Collection from Corcoran

Wed, 07/30/2014 - 18:53
July 30, 2014

As part of the Corcoran College of Art + Design’s integration with the George Washington University, the collections of the Corcoran College Library will relocate to GW’s Gelman Library.  The Corcoran collection will transfer as an art and design unit located on Gelman’s 1st floor.  Rare or fragile works will be managed in the Special Collections Research Center on Gelman’s 7th floor where they can be maintained in a controlled environment to support their longer term preservation.  The Corcoran art and design collection will be kept together on the 1st floor of Gelman rather than integrated with GW’s general collections. It will be accessible during normal Gelman Library hours.  
        
The finalization of the agreement between Corcoran, GW and the National Galleries is dependent on the DC courts’ final approval. The timeline presented here assumes that the agreement will be implemented by August 15th, 2014. The timing of the actual approval may impact these projected dates.

 

Objectives

  • Transfer the Corcoran Library collection to GW’s Gelman Library.   
  • Relocate the entire Corcoran collection to the first floor of Gelman Library as an art & design unit.
  • Minimize the time that the Corcoran collection is unavailable.
  • Minimize the disruption to library patrons in both locations caused by the transfer.

Proposed Timeline

June 27          Transition team formed.

July 2              Cease new loans of Corcoran library materials.

July 15            Close Corcoran Library to all users and due date for return of Corcoran Library items currently on loan to patrons.

July 15 – August 16

  • Work with library moving company on logistics of the move.
  • Bring records for Corcoran Library items into the GW Libraries catalog.
  • Carefully prepare, pack, and label Corcoran library resources to facilitate ready access after moving.
  • Update systems to enable Corcoran materials to circulate from GW Libraries.
  • Prepare space at Gelman for Corcoran collection.
  • Prepare orientation and communication materials to educate Corcoran faculty and students about the resources of GW Libraries.

August 16 – September 1  

  • Begin physical move of the Corcoran collection.
  • Remove 40,000+ library items from current shelving units and load onto temporary shelving carts.
  • Disassemble Corcoran shelving.
  • Reassemble Corcoran shelving in its new location at Gelman Library.
  • Transfer and shelve library materials in new location at Gelman.

September 2

  • Corcoran Library materials will be available for use and circulation at Gelman Library.
  • Physically process each item, including addition of barcodes & collection labels.

Teamsters Local 544 records

Thu, 07/24/2014 - 09:17

Come explore the inner workings of the Teamsters and see how unions operate and negotiate.

In Memoriam: Yehuda Nir

Wed, 07/23/2014 - 09:33
July 23, 2014

It is with great sadness that the GW Libraries acknowledge the passing of Dr. Yehuda Nir. Dr. Nir was a well-respected psychiatrist with a specialty in counseling patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. His life as a Holocaust survivor moved him to pursue this line of work and inspired him to write The Lost Childhood: The Complete Memoir, which details the years that Nir and his family spent seeking safety from Nazi persecution.

Dr. Nir and his wife, Dr. Bonnie Maslin, a GW alumna and member of the GW Libraries Development Advisory Council, have been longtime supporters of the Kiev Judaica Collection and an exhibit hall in Gelman Library bears their name.  The GW Libraries remain inspired by Dr. Nir’s resilience, determination, and commitment to making a difference in the world.  Read more about Dr. Nir in the New York Times article celebrating his life.

Required Summer Reading: D.C. Fiction

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 14:10

Read any good Washington fiction lately?

GW Libraries Closed for 4th of July

Thu, 07/03/2014 - 08:27
July 3, 2014

Gelman, Eckles and the Virginia Science & Technology Campus Library will be closed on Friday, July 4 for the Independence Day holiday.  Gelman Library will reopen at 10am on Saturday, July 5.  Eckles and VS&TCL will reopen on Monday, July 7. 

The GW Libraries wish all of our patrons a safe and happy 4th of July!

 

A New Look for the Catalog!

Tue, 07/01/2014 - 12:38
July 1, 2014

The GW Libraries catalog is getting a makeover for the Fall semester!  A sneak preview (beta test) is available now by selecting the "Catalog" tab above the search box and then clicking "see our new look!"

You can help us by trying it out early and reporting any questions or problems you encounter.  New features, including “advanced search,”will be added throughout the summer.  Search tips for power users are available to replicate "advanced search" options (i.e. search by title or author) until those features are added. 

We're proud that this catalog makeover was built by our own library Scholarly Technology Group.  It replaces a one-size-fits-all tool with a flexible and customizable solution to better meet the research needs for our patrons.  This new tool is also being made available to other libraries under a free and open source software license.  Surprised to hear the libraries write software?  Learn more about Why We Write Software at GW Libraries in this excellent blog post. 

 

USA World Cup Game in Room 219 Today

Tue, 07/01/2014 - 11:23
July 1, 2014

It's Team USA's time to shock the world! We will be watching today's big game against Belgium on the big screen in Gelman Room 219 at 4pm. It's soccer, so chanting U-S-A and funny hats are acceptable!

Student Spotlight: Sharing Research Through Wikipedia

Thu, 06/26/2014 - 10:57
June 26, 2014

by Elizabeth Settoducato
Gelman Communications Assistant
GW Class of 2015 (Women's Studies & Classical Studies)

“Don’t use Wikipedia.” “You can’t trust what you read on Wikipedia; anyone can edit it!” “Wikipedia isn’t real research.” I’ve heard similar caveats from elementary school through college. But attending Wikimedia DC’s Wikipedia editathon in Gelman Library complicated those one-sided warnings, and taught me a great deal about Wikipedia’s potential for collaborative research and community outreach.  

Organized by GW librarian Jenny Kinniff and Catholic University library science graduate student Chloe Raub, the editathon was an educational experience in many regards: participants learned the basics of becoming a Wikipedia editor and community member, and became acquainted with some of GW’s own archival and Special Collections materials along the way. Plus, there were snacks and drinks. What could be better?

After a helpful introduction to Wikipedia editing, citing sources, and creating encyclopedic content from Dominic McDevitt-Parks (Digital Content Specialist and Wikipedian-in-Residence at the National Archives), we were ready to get to work. Our mission was to improve and/or write articles pertaining to Washington, DC history, with a special focus on LGBT groups and movements in honor of Pride month.

Since this was my first time editing Wikipedia content, I figured I’d look through existing articles for grammar and accuracy. It took about one minute before I became distracted by the Special Collections materials that Jenny had provided for us: “Betty and Pansy’s Severe Queer Review of Washington, DC” was a colloquially written, semi-scandalous review of DC’s queer scene in 1993. GW’s Marvin Center even got a mention! I also spent quite a bit of time looking through the National Organization for Women (NOW) Washington, DC Chapter’s records, which included newsletters, memos, position papers, and more dating from the late 1970s to the early 1980s.

Realizing that I had yet to actually edit anything, I clicked over to an incomplete article (or a “stub” as Wikipedia would call it) on the Rainbow Pool, the reflecting pool that now sits at the center of the World War II Memorial on the National Mall. After leafing through some Special Collections books and browsing our online catalog for articles, I was able to learn more about the controversy over creating the WWII Memorial and the original design of the Rainbow Pool by architect Frederick Law Olmstead, Jr.

Sitting in that room full of editors, I saw very experienced folks working alongside people who’d never done this before. There was conversation, question-asking, and support. Surrounded by fascinating resources and a task that offered something for everyone, I felt like the editathon fostered a really wonderful sense of community and a connection to research. Wikipedia isn’t the forbidden, inaccurate source some fear it is; rather it can be dynamic site of learning where people and information come together for the sake of sharing and obtaining knowledge.

Welcome Corcoran College Students, Faculty and Staff!

Thu, 06/26/2014 - 10:24
June 26, 2014

As the two institutions work out the final details, GW Libraries is delighted to extend access privileges to our future students and faculty from the Corcoran School of Art + Design.  Corcoran affiliates can present a valid Corcoran ID at the Entrance Desk for admission.  Guest computer and wireless access is available at the Ask Us desk located on the entrance floor. 

Making History: The Campaign for GW

Mon, 06/23/2014 - 09:49
June 23, 2014

The intellectual powerhouse of a great university is its libraries, and the quality and capacity of GW's libraries are key to fulfilling the ambitions of the university, its students, and its faculty.

We aim to become an unparalleled hub of knowledge and research for the GW community. Join us in our journey! To learn more about supporting the GW Libraries and participating in Making History: The Campaign for GW, please visit http://campaign.gwu.edu/priorities/libraries.

Informing Social Feed Manager Development at GW

Thu, 06/12/2014 - 08:51
June 12, 2014Laura Wrubel, E-Resources Content Manager

One of our goals for the Social Feed Manager software we’re developing at GW Libraries is for it to be useful to other cultural heritage organizations who want to collect social media data. To help us understand these use cases and get feedback on our prototype software, we brought together a group of interested people from libraries, archives, and funding organizations on December 11 and 12, 2013.  At this meeting, generously supported by an IMLS Sparks Innovation Grant (LG-46-13-0257), the attendees each shared their experiences working with social media data at their institutions, described their needs for the future, and helped us identify areas and priorities for further development. We also spent the next morning helping those interested in getting Social Feed Manager up and running.

We kicked off the day with a round of talks by selected participants who have been working with social media data. We heard about current open source software projects at a number of institutions. 

  • Cory Lown at North Carolina State University (NCSU) demonstrated software called lentil for collecting, displaying, and managing Instagram photos of their new Hunt Library Building and found it a useful platform for engaging with students. 
  • Patrick Murray-John at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media has been working on integrating social media into the Omeka exhibit software using several social media APIs, such as Twitter and Flickr.
  • Ed Summers showed us twarc, a command line tool he wrote for archiving JSON twitter search results.

In addition, we heard about how libraries and archives are actively collecting social media for building their collections and supporting researchers:

  • NYU’s Tamiment Library has archived social media and websites from the Occupy Wall Street Movement, including Tumblr, videos, and images, using web crawling tools. Chela Scott Weber described their need to identify and capture web content that becomes significant in a community or provokes a movement--particularly content that is vulnerable to being removed later--archiving conversations around hashtags, mentions, and particular individuals or voices.
  • Manuscripts and Archives, in the Yale University Library, worked with the Office of the President to capture social media documenting the departure of the previous president and inauguration of Yale’s twenty-third President, Peter Salovey (http://inauguration.yale.edu/). They investigated open source and commercial providers of social media archiving services to capture different platforms.
  • Ivey Glendon from University of Virginia showed the digital archive she and her library created around the UVA presidential crisis in June 2012.  Their digital archivist gathered blogs, news articles, and tweets using TweetArchivist and other tools, capturing approximately 80,000 tweets, images from twitter, and blog posts. Some of the collection was submitted directly by users, utilizing Omeka to manage the user self-deposit process.
  • University of North Texas’s Mark Phillips described web content they’ve captured as part of their long-standing web archiving program. The have content related to U.S. Presidential term transitions, sites in the federal domain, election websites and candidate sites, and would like to extend that to social media accounts and events. UNT is also seeing increased demand from researchers for social media datasets, especially concerning events in Texas and prominent local figures.
  • Declan Fleming gave an overview of UC San Diego’s BigData@UCSD workshop, in which the library and IT departments participated. The event showcased several research data pilots conducted using the campus’s research cyberinfrastructure, including a project using Twitter data to study infectious disease prediction. The library is exploring options for collecting Twitter data for academic researchers.

Several GW faculty also gave brief presentations about their research involving social media and their experience using Social Feed Manager.  We’ll cover those in more depth in a future blog post.

As we discussed Social Feed Manager’s development path and further activities that each of our institutions needed SFM to support, two broad use cases emerged: (1) capturing social media as part of archival collections and (2) collecting social media datasets for researchers.

Among the specific needs we discussed were the following:

  • Capturing the context of the tweet. How might SFM help to capture both sides of the conversation when harvesting a user’s tweets or tweets on a particular topic? Archives, in particular, have a mission to provide this context for understanding collections. How might collecting content from referenced users be accomplished in a scalable way?
  • Archiving the look of Twitter in addition to the data. Current web archiving approaches capture how the site looked. Should a tool that captures tweets also allow the data to be “replayed” as it appeared on Twitter at time of capture?
  • Legal issues around collecting data from Twitter. The SFM application requires those who use it, either for collecting or viewing data, to agree to Twitter’s Rules of the Road, which describe its terms of service.  Developing local policies for collecting and archiving social media which are mindful of terms of service is a priority.
  • Harvesting data from social media platforms beyond Twitter and tying together identities across platforms. The IMLS Sparks grant that is supporting the current development focuses on Twitter, so that remains the immediate focus of SFM development. Yet there is also interest in Instagram, Facebook, and Tumblr, among other platforms for future collecting. How might we connect voices across these platforms and take into consideration metadata necessary to create and maintain those matchpoints?
  • Organizational support for social media collection, from both a technical and staffing perspective. Collecting social media data for researchers and archives is a new area of activity for most libraries. Cultural heritage institutions need help communicating the needs for this activity and what requirements, both in staffing and technical infrastructure, are needed for locally supporting SFM. To address this need, we’ve embarked on a documentation push, to be released later this summer.

As we considered these needs around Social Feed Manager, we didn’t reach a clear point of divergence between supporting the two use cases--creating archival collections and research datasets.  In fact, the distinction between the use cases may not be meaningful. Web archives are themselves datasets and increasingly treated as such by researchers using computational methodologies.  With that in mind, we’ll continue to develop the software to support the needs articulated above and work toward increasing SFM’s overall reliability and ease of use. Looking forward to seeing where this takes us.

Change in Special Collections Public Service Hours

Wed, 06/11/2014 - 18:43

The Special Collections Research Center will no longer be offering Wednesday evening public service hours.

In Memoriam: Janet Olsen

Wed, 06/11/2014 - 10:13
June 11, 2014

GW Libraries and the GW community mourn the loss of our friend and colleague Janet Olsen. A native of Cleveland, OH and Florida, Janet worked at Gelman Library from 1995 until her retirement in 2013. As a reference librarian, Janet worked closely with the University Writing Program and its UW 1020 course, in which capacity she collaborated closely with several Writing Program faculty. But Janet’s generosity, creative intelligence, wry humor, and joie de vivre endeared her to colleagues and students both within the Libraries and across the university. She will be sorely missed.

Janet was also an accomplished visual artist in multiple media. In tribute to her collegiality and her irrepressibly creative spirit, what follows is a collaborative portrait of Janet, drawn by several colleagues and friends. Always willing to go “not only the extra mile, but the extra 100 miles,” Janet brought an intensity of dedication to her work with patrons that made her a model for her colleagues. As noted by a long-time veteran of the Libraries, “She was one of the best Reference librarians I've had the pleasure to work with. She was great at finding the problems before the student and advocating for their rights to tools that worked right the first time.” Janet was also a cherished mentor to junior colleagues; notes one, “When I just started working here I had a few reference desk trainings with her and she could do it like nobody else, with a great sense of humor and energy. Like a true artist she always had an unconventional approach to doing things.” Never content with pat answers or the complacency that masquerades as common sense, Janet inspired us with her transformative enthusiasm. To her (a fan of the Nero Wolfe books), references librarians were “information detectives,” and our work was both an ethical commitment and an intellectual adventure. And yet, she managed to challenge our assumptions without being polemical or dogmatic; in her work with colleagues and students alike she knew what a quick wit and a generous laugh can accomplish, and with a bon mot she cut to the heart of many a tiresome discussion: “We’re just rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic.”

Her professional equanimity no doubt owed much to her rich life outside of the profession. A “woman of many interests,” she enjoyed astronomy and horticulture, read voraciously, traveled widely, and hosted unforgettable dinner parties. As a jeweler and bead-maker, she supplied colleagues with both beautiful objects (“ I have a treasure box of necklaces Janet gave to me...she gave me so many I never will have to buy any again”) and an infectious passion (“I lay my addiction to beading and jewelry making directly at her feet!”). But Janet’s two chief passions were painting and drawing, and the vicissitudes of the Washington Capitals. With a graduate degree in graphic design, this former landscape architect devoted her mornings and weekends to a practice that she summed up in the title of her blog: “Observe Closely.” The blog offers a glimpse of her aesthetic journey through oils, watercolors, pastels, pen and ink, gouache, and encaustic – a journey that she undertook with the hand and eye of a master but the heart of a student. Those of us who have the privilege of having one or two of Janet’s productions cherish them as emblems of an openness and magnanimity that approached the world itself as a treasure, as the source of a richness of experience that stands as an example to us all. Only Janet could make the unfledged spectator appreciate the balletic grace of a good hockey game. At the same time, she knew the virtue of a good heckle – knew that shyness and reserve are not healthy for the soul.

With friends, colleagues, and patrons, Janet struck that rare balance: a fundamentally “unconditional kindness” combined with the courage and honesty always to speak her mind. She will be remembered as someone who lived life after her own fashion, without needing or wanting to impose her way on anyone else. We mourn her loss; we look to the light of her memory. May the spirit of this “Rabelaisian librarian” always kindle that “mischievous glow” in the eyes of those whom her humor, wisdom, and generosity touched. Or in the words of a colleague, “For the last year, since she retired...when I would get stuck, I would ask: what would Janet do?”

Written collaboratively by the GW Libraries Staff

Gelman welcomes Colonial Inauguration!

Mon, 06/09/2014 - 10:54
June 9, 2014

Gelman is proud to host the Academic Experience segment of Colonial Inauguration (CI) from 3:30-5pm on the following dates:

Friday, June 13
Thursday, June 29
Wednesday, June 25
Monday, June 30

This is an exciting chance for the GW Libraries to engage incoming students and let them know how we can help them succeed. These sessions will take place on the entrance floor and will include many people and some noise. Services will remain open and other areas of the library should be minimally affected.

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