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De-Stress@The Library!

Thu, 04/20/2017 - 19:53

Gateway Library is hosting a     De-Stress Fest event on May 4 from 3:30 to 7 p.m. Join us for some Lego-ing and art therapy, too! Free! Fun! Relaxation and refreshments are yours to enjoy as you prepare for Final Exams. Hope to see you there!

For more information, please contact Allison O’Connor, aoconnor at gmu.edu

 

Categories: University News

Mason Author Series: General Michael V. Hayden

Tue, 04/18/2017 - 10:00

Join the University Libraries for a discussion with General Michael V. Hayden about his book, Playing to the Edge: American Intelligence in the Age of Terror, on Thursday, May 4 at 3 p.m. in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room.

For General Michael Hayden, playing to the edge means playing so close to the line that you get chalk dust on your cleats. Otherwise, by playing back, you may protect yourself, but you will be less successful in protecting America. “Play to the edge” was Hayden’s guiding principle when he ran the National Security Agency, and it remained so when he ran the CIA.  In his view, many shortsighted and uninformed people are quick to criticize, and this book will give them much to chew on but little easy comfort; it is an unapologetic insider’s look told from the perspective of the people who faced awesome responsibilities head on, in the moment.

How did American intelligence respond to terrorism, a major war and the most sweeping technological revolution in the last 500 years?  What was the NSA before 9/11 and how did it change in its aftermath?  Why did the NSA begin the controversial terrorist surveillance program that included the acquisition of domestic phone records? What else was set in motion during this period that formed the backdrop for the infamous Snowden revelations in 2013?

For 10 years, General Michael Hayden was a participant in some of the most telling events in the annals of American national security. General Hayden’s goals in writing this book are simple and unwavering: No apologies. No excuses. Just what happened. And why. As he writes, “There is a story here that deserves to be told, without varnish and without spin. My view is my view, and others will certainly have different perspectives, but this view deserves to be told to create as complete a history as possible of these turbulent times. I bear no grudges, or at least not many, but I do want this to be a straightforward and readable history for that slice of the American population who depend on and appreciate intelligence, but who do not have the time to master its many obscure characteristics.”

General and Distinguished Visiting Professor Michael Hayden is a retired four-star general who served as director of the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency — the only person to helm both agencies— during a time of heinous new threats and wrenching change. In addition to leading CIA and NSA, General Hayden was the country’s first principal deputy director of national intelligence and the highest-ranking military intelligence officer in the country.  He also served as commander of the Air Intelligence Agency and Director of the Joint Command and Control Warfare Center and served in senior staff positions at the Pentagon, at US European Command, at the National Security Council, and the US Embassy in Bulgaria. He was also the deputy chief of staff for the United Nations Command and US Forces in South Korea. He is currently a principal at the Chertoff Group and a distinguished visiting professor at the George Mason University Schar School of Policy and Government.

Categories: University News

Exploratory Analysis of Historic Document Collections

Fri, 04/14/2017 - 10:12

Dr. Dieter Pfoser of George Mason’s Geography and GeoInformation department will present on his latest project with the National Archives’ Founders Online database and describe his process for creating interactive maps and visualizations from correspondence collections. The lecture will be held on Monday, April 24, 3:30 p.m, Main Reading Room, Fenwick Library.

The presentation is sponsored by University Libraries’ Digital Humanities Working Group. For more information, please contact George Oberle, History Librarian, goberle at gmu.edu

 

Categories: University News

Fake News: Learn to Discern!

Mon, 04/10/2017 - 10:58

The ability to tell the difference between accurate news and fake news is an important skill that you’ll use for the rest of your life. In this one hour workshop, attendees will learn how to:

  • Recognize fake or misleading news stories
  • Critically evaluate news sources using a variety of strategies (such as IMVAIN, reverse image searching, fact-checking sites, and others)
  • Find reliable print and web-based information sources

Learn to discern! Join us on April 20 at 2 p.m. in 228 Gateway Library.  For more information, please contact Royce Gildersleeve, rgilder at gmu.edu, 703-993-9867.

 

Categories: University News

Mason Author Series: Jennifer Ritterhouse

Mon, 04/10/2017 - 09:06

Join the University Libraries for the book launch of Discovering the South: One Man’s Travels Through a Changing America in the 1930s on Wednesday, April 26 at 3 p.m. in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room.

During the Great Depression, the American South was not merely “the nation’s number one economic problem,” as President Franklin Roosevelt declared. It was also a battlefield on which forces for and against social change were starting to form. For a white southern liberal like Jonathan Daniels, editor of the Raleigh News and Observer, it was a fascinating moment to explore. Attuned to culture as well as politics, Daniels knew the true South lay somewhere between Erskine Caldwell’s Tobacco Road and Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind. On May 5, 1937, he set out to find it, driving thousands of miles in his trusty Plymouth and ultimately interviewing even Mitchell herself.

In Discovering the South, historian Jennifer Ritterhouse pieces together Daniels’s unpublished notes from his tour along with his published writings and a wealth of archival evidence to put this one man’s journey through a South in transition into a larger context. Daniels’s well chosen itinerary brought him face to face with the full range of political and cultural possibilities in the South of the 1930s, from New Deal liberalism and social planning in the Tennessee Valley Authority, to Communist agitation in the Scottsboro case, to planters’ and industrialists’ reactionary worldview and repressive violence. The result is a lively narrative of black and white southerners fighting for and against democratic social change at the start of the nation’s long civil rights era.

Visit the author’s website for more about the project.

Jennifer Ritterhouse is associate professor of history at George Mason University. She is the author of Growing Up Jim Crow: How Black and White Southern Children Learned Race and several articles; editor of a reprint edition of Sarah Patton Boyle’s autobiography, The Desegregated Heart: A Virginian’s Stand in Time of Transition; and co-editor of Remembering Jim Crow: African Americans Tell About Life in the Segregated South. She teaches classes on the 20th-century US, the South, cultural history, and research methods.

The University Libraries’ Mason Author Series features Mason faculty and alumni authors throughout the year, and is generously sponsored by the University Bookstore. Upcoming readings include Visiting Professor Michael Hayden on May 4.

Categories: University News

Artists’ Books in Conversation with Zines

Mon, 04/10/2017 - 09:04

In conjunction with the Zine Fair (hosted by Assistant Professor Christopher Kardambikis’ art class), the Mason community is invited to visit the Special Collections Research Center (2400 Fenwick) on Wednesday, April 26. Join us between 2 and 5 p.m. to learn more about our artists’ book collection and to view artists’ books in conversation with the various themes and formats of zines.

For more information, contact Rebecca Bramlett, Research Services Coordinator, at rbramlet@gmu.edu or 3-2058.

Categories: University News

Presentation: Missing Out on Innovation

Mon, 04/03/2017 - 11:19

Missing Out on Innovation: African-American Teens & Technology

DR. KEVIN CLARK, DIRECTOR
CENTER FOR DIGITAL MEDIA INNOVATION & DIVERSITY
APRIL 27    1:30 – 2:30 P.M.    MAIN READING ROOM    2001 FENWICK

Based on a new national survey, young African-Americans may be missing out on key opportunities to learn to code, develop apps and software, and innovate with technology. Sponsored by Mason Libraries, Dr. Kevin Clark will speak about his recent research on African-American teens and digital innovations on Thursday, April 27, 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., Main Reading Room, 2001 Fenwick. The hour-long presentation includes a question and answer session.

Dr. Clark is a professor in Mason’s College of Education and Human Development, and is also the Director of Mason’s Center for Digital Media Innovation and Diversity.

For more information, please contact Andrew Lee, yli7 at gmu.edu

Categories: University News

University Service Awards 2017

Fri, 03/31/2017 - 10:48

Congratulations to the following library staff for their service to George Mason University and/or the Commonwealth of Virginia. The awards will be will be given on April 5 and April 6 at the University Day Service Awards celebrations.

25 years

  • David Alexander, Access Services
  • Jamie Coniglio, Research and Educational Services
  • Kathleen Kehoe, Development, Office of the Dean of Libraries and University Librarian

15 years

  • Jessica Bowdoin, Access Services
  • Friedgard Cowan, Resource Description & Metadata Services, Technical Services Group
  • Allison O’Connor, Teaching and Learning Services
  • Vittoria Perrone, Access Services
  • Kevin Sanders, Administrative Services

10 years

  • Jessica Clark, Development
  • Claudia Holland, Mason Publishing Group
  • Denise Klasen-Lopez, Teaching and Learning Services

5 years

  • Lynn Eaton, Special Collections Research Center
  • Kimberley Edwards, Technical Services Group
  • Royce Gildersleeve, Teaching and Learning Services
  • Debby Kermer, Data Services Group
  • Tricia Mackenzie, Resource Description & Metadata Services, Technical Services Group
  • Leigh Ann Skeen, Collection Development
  • Stephanie Smith, Collection Development

 

Categories: University News

#Give2Mason on April 6!

Thu, 03/30/2017 - 11:50

Giving Day, on Thursday, April 6, 2017, is George Mason University’s first ever university-wide day of giving. This date was selected to coincide closely with the date Mason became an independent university (April 7, 1972). In 2017, Mason will celebrate 45 years as an independent institution.

From midnight through 11:59 p.m. EST on April 6, everyone is invited to make their mark by giving to Mason. With unit fundraising projects, challenge gifts, a visible on-campus presence in Fairfax, a social media ambassador challenge, and real-time updates, all are encouraged to show their Patriot pride by making a gift to Mason.

Giving Day will be a day for everyone to join together to support specific projects at Mason that resonate with them – or to support the university in general! As part of the Faster Farther campaign, all gifts, big and small, are welcome.

As part of Mason’s first annual Giving Day, the Libraries is launching a new initiative – the University Libraries Student Assistant Scholarship Endowment – in response to a challenge gift coming from a Mason alumna who was a former University Libraries’ student employee.

With the generosity of Mason alumni and friends, the Libraries will create an endowment to recognize and support student assistants who have demonstrated outstanding work performance in the University Libraries while meeting the academic requirements of their coursework at Mason. The purpose of the endowment will be to award a scholarship each year to provide assistance for an undergraduate student employee’s educational expenses at Mason.

Together, we can all make Mason’s first Giving Day a success and help support our students! Questions? Contact Kathleen Kehoe, Director of Development for the University Libraries, kkehoe@gmu.edu.

Categories: University News

A Sea Change: Film Screening

Wed, 03/29/2017 - 11:51

Mason Libraries’ Science & Technology Subject Librarian Team and Roosevelt@Mason are co-sponsoring a screening of “A Sea Change”.  The film will be shown in the Johnson Center Gold Room at 7 p.m. on April 11.

A life-long sportsman and retired educator, Sven Huseby considers himself a well-informed environmentalist. But he is caught by surprise when he reads about the effect of excess carbon dioxide on the ocean in Elizabeth Kolbert’s New Yorker article, “The Darkening Sea.” Sven embarks on a mission to learn more, wrestling with the possibility that his five-year-old grandson Elias will inherit an ocean bereft of the fish which have meant so much to their family. Sven uncovers research on the world’s acidifying seas and its dramatic implications for our culture and economy. – Written by Niiijii Films

For more information, please contact Kathy Butler, kbutle18 at gmu.edu.

Categories: University News

Fenwick Fellows Lecture: Skirting the Issue

Tue, 03/28/2017 - 09:24

Join the University Libraries on Thursday, April 13 at 2 p.m. in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room, for Dr. Kristina Olson‘s lecture, “Skirting the Issue: Clothing and Politics in 14th Century Italy,” where she will discuss her research findings from her 2015-2016 Fenwick fellowship.

Lecture Abstract: From the mid-13th to the end of the 14th century, an increase in mercantile activity in Florence and other cities in Italy witnessed the proliferation of new wealth among families that did not belong to the aristocracy. This economic development, together with other demographic shifts (such as those caused by the Black Death, ca.1350), caused many non-aristocratic families to climb in social and political power. One way in which they displayed their change in status was by means of their clothing and jewelry, thereby wearing their newfound gains on their persons. This drastic shift in social markers of status bred envy and confusion: families with long-standing claims to nobility appeared impoverished in comparison with these rising upstarts. Bitter feuding and acts of vengeance between the leading aristocratic and mercantile families ensued. In order to maintain social order, civic sumptuary legislation targeted various displays of luxury: excessive spending on clothing, jewelry, and rituals, such as funereal practices and exorbitant wedding dowries.

As clothing comprises a visual language signifying status, then, for many authors of the Italian Middle Ages clothing and luxury became an essential part of their poetic language, bound up with politics and civic identity. Dr. Olson’s book project, Sumptuous Literature: Clothing and Governance in Fourteenth-Century Italy, explores how authors interpret the relationship of wealth, politics and the body in terms that alternately target women (misogyny) or men (misandry) during this exceptional moment in economic and social history.

About the Fenwick Fellows: The Fenwick Fellowship is awarded annually to a Mason faculty member to pursue a research project that uses and enhances the University Libraries’ resources while advancing knowledge in the faculty member’s field. Applications for the 2017-2018 fellowship are currently being accepted; the deadline is May 5, 2017.

Categories: University News

Mason Author Series: Helon Habila

Tue, 03/28/2017 - 09:18

Join the University Libraries, in conjunction with the Creative Writing Program’s New Leaves Festival, for a reading and signing by Helon Habila on Wednesday, April 5 at 7:30pm in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room.

Helon Habila, an Associate Professor of Creative Writing at Mason, will discuss The Chibok Girls, his compassionate and powerful account of one of the most horrific recent tragedies to occur in Nigeria: the kidnapping of 276 girls from the Chibok Secondary School in April 2014 by Boko Haram, one of the world’s deadliest terrorist group whose name translated into English means “western education is abhorrent.” Habila, a native of Nigeria, traveled to the country twice to track down some of the escaped girls and their families and reconstruct what happened on that fateful day and how the town is coping. He situates the kidnappings within the political and historical context of the rise of Islamist extremism in Nigeria, which is deeply rooted in its tragic history of colonialism.

The University Libraries’ Mason Author Series features Mason faculty and alumni authors throughout the year, and is generously sponsored by the University Bookstore. Upcoming readings include Associate Professor Jennifer Ritterhouse on April 26 and Visiting Professor Michael Hayden on May 4.

Categories: University News

iWeek Event@Gateway

Mon, 03/27/2017 - 10:46


Celebrate International Week!

Bollywood Trivia   April 5, 4:30-5:30 p.m.   228 Gateway Library

Test your Bollywood knowledge with Gateway Library staff in Room 228 Gateway Library. Fun, food and prizes are in store at this iWeek event. Join us April 5, 4:30-5:30 p.m.!

For more information, please contact Allison O’Connor, aoconnor at gmu.edu,703-993-9055

 

Categories: University News

Pride Week Film Screenings

Mon, 03/27/2017 - 10:07

Celebrate Pride Week!

Dinner + A Movie: “Kate Bornstein is a Queer & Pleasant Danger”

  • April 7, 6-9 p.m.  228 Gateway Library
  • Gateway Library is hosting a dinner and a movie for Pride Week 2017.
  • Co-sponsored by Pride Alliance.
  • Free!
  • For more information, please contact Izzie Hunsberger, msibley at gmu.edu

Film Screening: “Moonlight”

  • April 13, 4:30-7:30 p.m.  Johnson Center Cinema
  • 2017 Oscar for Best Picture.
  • Co-sponsored by University Libraries, Film & Media Studies, Film & Video Studies, ODIME, and African & African American Studies.
  • Free!
  • For more information, please contact Patricia West, pwest6 at gmu.edu
Categories: University News

Spring into Well-Being with the Libraries!

Mon, 03/27/2017 - 09:23

Spring into Well-Being is here! Shake off the stress of spring semester and cultivate your physical, emotional, and community well-being with the following resources from the University Libraries.

NYTimes Food and Travel

Dig deeper than the front page and discover a world of food and travel. Strengthen your body with a wholesome loaf of Nordic whole-grain rye as you contemplate a hiking trip through remote Canada. Restore your spirit with a batch of chocolate ice cream profiteroles while planning a dream getaway to Barcelona. Explore new communities, learn new traditions, and recharge your batteries—all for free, from the comfort of home. NOTE: First time users must create a new account here using their GMU credentials to gain access.

National Geographic Virtual Library

Broaden your perspective and investigate the world with National Geographic online. Browse full-color issues from 1888 to the present; explore maps, images, and videos; or play with the interactive Term Frequency chart and watch the way we talk about our world shift through the years.

Swank Digital Campus

For those days when you just need to watch a movie, explore this rotating collection of 25 feature films and documentaries. Challenge yourself with films like An Inconvenient Truth or Malcolm X; watch a recent blockbuster like Inglourious Basterds; or kick back with a classic like The Breakfast Club or The Godfather. Specific titles may change over time. NOTE: Requires local installation of Widevine Media Optimizer; best accessed via Google Chrome.

These are just a few of the many resources available via the Libraries for Mason faculty, staff, and students. Just login with your Mason NetID and password. For more information on the resources available to you through the University Libraries, browse the Libraries’ subject lists of online resources or contact one of the subject specialists.

Categories: University News

Pop-Up Pantry Donation Drive

Wed, 03/22/2017 - 14:28

Help stock the Mason Pop-Up Pantry! Gateway Library is sponsoring a donation drive from March 31 through April 8.  Drop off your pantry donations at either Gateway Library or Fenwick Library service desks. You will receive a chance to win a Panera Gift Certificate! (One chance per each item donated).

What does the Pantry need?

  • Granola Bars
  • Rice, Pasta
  • Chips, Drinks, Soy Milk
  • Crackers & Cereal
  • Seasonings
  • Toiletries, Cleaning Supplies, Detergent, Dish Soap
  • Pens, Pencils, Paper Clips
  • Canned Fruit & Meat
  • Gummies
  • Paper Towels
  • Tofu, Organic Items
  • Pasta Sauce
  • Bottled Water
  • Gloves
  • Kleenex (Boxes)

For more information, please contact Allison O’Connor, Gateway Library, aoconnor @ gmu.edu

Categories: University News

Gilbert & Sullivan Exhibition Opening and Reception: Join us on March 30!

Wed, 03/22/2017 - 11:12

The University Libraries is excited to announce the opening of a major Gilbert & Sullivan exhibition, “Oh, Joy Unbounded…”: A Celebration of Gilbert & Sullivan, featuring items from the David and Annabelle Stone Gilbert & Sullivan Collection.

The Mason community is invited to join us for an exhibition opening celebration from 3:30 to 5 p.m. on Thursday, March 30 in the Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center on the second floor of Fenwick Library (Room 2400). The program will open with remarks by Rick Davis, Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts, and will include a tour of the exhibition by David Stone, who we have to thank for amassing this stunning collection of Gilbert & Sullivan memorabilia.

Three galleries in Fenwick Library are dedicated to displaying items from the Stones’ remarkable collection, which will be on view through May. The exhibition is part of a larger celebration of the famous duo, which the Libraries and the College of Visual and Performing Arts are coordinating at Mason. In addition to the exhibition, there will be performances and a scholarly forum. Additional information about the exhibition may be found here, and tickets for performances and the forum may be purchased here.

Categories: University News

Faculty Workshop: Open Educational Resources

Tue, 03/21/2017 - 10:53

Concerned about high textbook costs for your students? Frustrated with the limitations of the published textbook you have been using in your course?

Explore possible alternatives by attending a workshop and writing a book review of an open textbook. Receive a $250 stipend for your efforts!

Mason faculty and instructors are invited to attend an Open Textbook Workshop on Friday, March 24, from 1:30 – 3:00 PM at Fenwick Library, Fairfax Campus, Room 1014 A & B. The University Libraries, Center for Teaching and Faculty Excellence, and Office of Digital Learning proudly sponsor this workshop. Registration is required.

Stipends will be distributed to faculty based on the availability of open textbooks for review and a desire for wide representation of courses (discipline and level). Stipend recipients must write and submit a short book review (form provided) within six weeks after the Open Textbook Workshop.The reviews will benefit other faculty considering adoption of affordable course content. For examples of book reviews, please see those posted on the Open Textbook Library (OTL) website.

When you complete the Open Textbook Workshop Registration Form, please identify an open textbook in your discipline from the Open Textbook Library (OTL) that you are interested in exploring; search the OTL list for possible options.

If you have any questions about the Open Textbook Workshop, selecting a textbook for review, or Open Educational Resources in general, please contact Claudia Holland, Scholarly Communication and Copyright Librarian in the Mason Publishing Group, University Libraries, at (703) 993-2544 or chollan3@gmu.edu.

Categories: University News

Workshop: Publishing Strategies, Tools, and Services

Mon, 03/20/2017 - 15:23

Interested in publishing your scholarly work? Join the Libraries for an informative workshop on Thursday, April 12, from 3 to 5 p.m., in Fenwick Library Instruction Room 4010.

Collaborating with a publisher starts before your manuscript is submitted. Geared toward early career authors this workshop will explore a visual outline of the editorial and production process supporting the publication of your article or book, and discuss the benefits of electronic publishing’s global reach. The core of this workshop, conducted by Mitch Moulton from Springer/Nature, will highlight the online tools and services freely available throughout the publishing process including:

  • How to develop wider relations by locating other experts in your field
  • How to find the right journal or editorial contact
  • Learning modules to help you write, submit, and publish your manuscript or become a peer reviewer.

Sponsored by SP@RC and Mason Publishing Group, the workshop will also feature a tour of SP@RC by Jason Byrd (Head, Information Services) and a discussion on the benefits of open access by Claudia Holland (Scholarly Communication and Copyright Officer).

If you plan to attend, please register at http://gmu.libcal.com/event/3234300.

Categories: University News

Fenwick Fellow Program Expands

Wed, 03/15/2017 - 14:36
Beginning with the 2017 cycle, the Fenwick Fellow program will expand beyond the single faculty award. University Libraries will offer an additional fellowship to fund a Mason faculty project proposal that specifically aligns with the Libraries’ ever-increasing activities in the area of digital scholarship (e.g., digital humanities, data-focused research, development of digital content and curation). Each Fenwick Fellow will receive $5,000, exclusive use of a furnished and equipped office in Fenwick Library as well as access to our Digital Scholarship Center (DiSC).

Revised guidelines for Fenwick Fellow applications are forthcoming.  
Categories: University News

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