University News

Bennett Named Among Top 25 Criminal Justice Professors

American University News - Thu, 06/12/2014 - 14:36
A forensic education blog included Richard Bennett on its list of the top 25 criminal justice professors in the country.
Categories: University News

Couple Returns to Campus to Celebrate 50 Years Together

American University News - Thu, 06/12/2014 - 13:15
Gerry and Joni Sommer met on the stairs of Mary Graydon Center – and returned to commemorate it.
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A Tradition of Pride   

American University News - Thu, 06/12/2014 - 13:04
AU’s Pride Alumni Alliance is celebrating the LGBTQ and ally community. Learn about AU’s 50-year history of activism and what the future holds.
Categories: University News

MPA grad introduces President Obama

American University News - Thu, 06/12/2014 - 10:43
Andy MacCracken, SPA alum and a national advocate for college affordability, recently introduced President Obama before a speech on student loan debt.
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Marilee Adams Receives IPPY Award

American University News - Thu, 06/12/2014 - 09:54
Adam's, an adjunct professor for the Key Executive Leadership Programs, received the gold medal IPPY Award in the Education II category.
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Kogod Female Faculty Outnumber Most Competitors

American University News - Thu, 06/12/2014 - 09:47
Three new female Kogod associate professors reflective of the school’s high percentage of women tenure and tenure-track faculty.
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Informing Social Feed Manager Development at GW

The George Washington University - Thu, 06/12/2014 - 08:51
June 12, 2014Laura Wrubel, E-Resources Content Manager

One of our goals for the Social Feed Manager software we’re developing at GW Libraries is for it to be useful to other cultural heritage organizations who want to collect social media data. To help us understand these use cases and get feedback on our prototype software, we brought together a group of interested people from libraries, archives, and funding organizations on December 11 and 12, 2013.  At this meeting, generously supported by an IMLS Sparks Innovation Grant (LG-46-13-0257), the attendees each shared their experiences working with social media data at their institutions, described their needs for the future, and helped us identify areas and priorities for further development. We also spent the next morning helping those interested in getting Social Feed Manager up and running.

We kicked off the day with a round of talks by selected participants who have been working with social media data. We heard about current open source software projects at a number of institutions. 

  • Cory Lown at North Carolina State University (NCSU) demonstrated software called lentil for collecting, displaying, and managing Instagram photos of their new Hunt Library Building and found it a useful platform for engaging with students. 
  • Patrick Murray-John at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media has been working on integrating social media into the Omeka exhibit software using several social media APIs, such as Twitter and Flickr.
  • Ed Summers showed us twarc, a command line tool he wrote for archiving JSON twitter search results.

In addition, we heard about how libraries and archives are actively collecting social media for building their collections and supporting researchers:

  • NYU’s Tamiment Library has archived social media and websites from the Occupy Wall Street Movement, including Tumblr, videos, and images, using web crawling tools. Chela Scott Weber described their need to identify and capture web content that becomes significant in a community or provokes a movement--particularly content that is vulnerable to being removed later--archiving conversations around hashtags, mentions, and particular individuals or voices.
  • Manuscripts and Archives, in the Yale University Library, worked with the Office of the President to capture social media documenting the departure of the previous president and inauguration of Yale’s twenty-third President, Peter Salovey (http://inauguration.yale.edu/). They investigated open source and commercial providers of social media archiving services to capture different platforms.
  • Ivey Glendon from University of Virginia showed the digital archive she and her library created around the UVA presidential crisis in June 2012.  Their digital archivist gathered blogs, news articles, and tweets using TweetArchivist and other tools, capturing approximately 80,000 tweets, images from twitter, and blog posts. Some of the collection was submitted directly by users, utilizing Omeka to manage the user self-deposit process.
  • University of North Texas’s Mark Phillips described web content they’ve captured as part of their long-standing web archiving program. The have content related to U.S. Presidential term transitions, sites in the federal domain, election websites and candidate sites, and would like to extend that to social media accounts and events. UNT is also seeing increased demand from researchers for social media datasets, especially concerning events in Texas and prominent local figures.
  • Declan Fleming gave an overview of UC San Diego’s BigData@UCSD workshop, in which the library and IT departments participated. The event showcased several research data pilots conducted using the campus’s research cyberinfrastructure, including a project using Twitter data to study infectious disease prediction. The library is exploring options for collecting Twitter data for academic researchers.

Several GW faculty also gave brief presentations about their research involving social media and their experience using Social Feed Manager.  We’ll cover those in more depth in a future blog post.

As we discussed Social Feed Manager’s development path and further activities that each of our institutions needed SFM to support, two broad use cases emerged: (1) capturing social media as part of archival collections and (2) collecting social media datasets for researchers.

Among the specific needs we discussed were the following:

  • Capturing the context of the tweet. How might SFM help to capture both sides of the conversation when harvesting a user’s tweets or tweets on a particular topic? Archives, in particular, have a mission to provide this context for understanding collections. How might collecting content from referenced users be accomplished in a scalable way?
  • Archiving the look of Twitter in addition to the data. Current web archiving approaches capture how the site looked. Should a tool that captures tweets also allow the data to be “replayed” as it appeared on Twitter at time of capture?
  • Legal issues around collecting data from Twitter. The SFM application requires those who use it, either for collecting or viewing data, to agree to Twitter’s Rules of the Road, which describe its terms of service.  Developing local policies for collecting and archiving social media which are mindful of terms of service is a priority.
  • Harvesting data from social media platforms beyond Twitter and tying together identities across platforms. The IMLS Sparks grant that is supporting the current development focuses on Twitter, so that remains the immediate focus of SFM development. Yet there is also interest in Instagram, Facebook, and Tumblr, among other platforms for future collecting. How might we connect voices across these platforms and take into consideration metadata necessary to create and maintain those matchpoints?
  • Organizational support for social media collection, from both a technical and staffing perspective. Collecting social media data for researchers and archives is a new area of activity for most libraries. Cultural heritage institutions need help communicating the needs for this activity and what requirements, both in staffing and technical infrastructure, are needed for locally supporting SFM. To address this need, we’ve embarked on a documentation push, to be released later this summer.

As we considered these needs around Social Feed Manager, we didn’t reach a clear point of divergence between supporting the two use cases--creating archival collections and research datasets.  In fact, the distinction between the use cases may not be meaningful. Web archives are themselves datasets and increasingly treated as such by researchers using computational methodologies.  With that in mind, we’ll continue to develop the software to support the needs articulated above and work toward increasing SFM’s overall reliability and ease of use. Looking forward to seeing where this takes us.

Change in Special Collections Public Service Hours

The George Washington University - Wed, 06/11/2014 - 18:43

The Special Collections Research Center will no longer be offering Wednesday evening public service hours.

The Desert Island Reading List

American University News - Wed, 06/11/2014 - 16:20
AU Literature Department professors discuss their favorite fiction.
Categories: University News

5 LGBT Resources at the AU Library

American University News - Wed, 06/11/2014 - 12:16
Learn more about the suite of LGBT resources available through AU Library. Everything from the specialized collection at the Gender & Sexuality Library to the variety of streaming films relating to LGBT issues.
Categories: University News

In Memoriam: Janet Olsen

The George Washington University - Wed, 06/11/2014 - 10:13
June 11, 2014

GW Libraries and the GW community mourn the loss of our friend and colleague Janet Olsen. A native of Cleveland, OH and Florida, Janet worked at Gelman Library from 1995 until her retirement in 2013. As a reference librarian, Janet worked closely with the University Writing Program and its UW 1020 course, in which capacity she collaborated closely with several Writing Program faculty. But Janet’s generosity, creative intelligence, wry humor, and joie de vivre endeared her to colleagues and students both within the Libraries and across the university. She will be sorely missed.

Janet was also an accomplished visual artist in multiple media. In tribute to her collegiality and her irrepressibly creative spirit, what follows is a collaborative portrait of Janet, drawn by several colleagues and friends. Always willing to go “not only the extra mile, but the extra 100 miles,” Janet brought an intensity of dedication to her work with patrons that made her a model for her colleagues. As noted by a long-time veteran of the Libraries, “She was one of the best Reference librarians I've had the pleasure to work with. She was great at finding the problems before the student and advocating for their rights to tools that worked right the first time.” Janet was also a cherished mentor to junior colleagues; notes one, “When I just started working here I had a few reference desk trainings with her and she could do it like nobody else, with a great sense of humor and energy. Like a true artist she always had an unconventional approach to doing things.” Never content with pat answers or the complacency that masquerades as common sense, Janet inspired us with her transformative enthusiasm. To her (a fan of the Nero Wolfe books), references librarians were “information detectives,” and our work was both an ethical commitment and an intellectual adventure. And yet, she managed to challenge our assumptions without being polemical or dogmatic; in her work with colleagues and students alike she knew what a quick wit and a generous laugh can accomplish, and with a bon mot she cut to the heart of many a tiresome discussion: “We’re just rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic.”

Her professional equanimity no doubt owed much to her rich life outside of the profession. A “woman of many interests,” she enjoyed astronomy and horticulture, read voraciously, traveled widely, and hosted unforgettable dinner parties. As a jeweler and bead-maker, she supplied colleagues with both beautiful objects (“ I have a treasure box of necklaces Janet gave to me...she gave me so many I never will have to buy any again”) and an infectious passion (“I lay my addiction to beading and jewelry making directly at her feet!”). But Janet’s two chief passions were painting and drawing, and the vicissitudes of the Washington Capitals. With a graduate degree in graphic design, this former landscape architect devoted her mornings and weekends to a practice that she summed up in the title of her blog: “Observe Closely.” The blog offers a glimpse of her aesthetic journey through oils, watercolors, pastels, pen and ink, gouache, and encaustic – a journey that she undertook with the hand and eye of a master but the heart of a student. Those of us who have the privilege of having one or two of Janet’s productions cherish them as emblems of an openness and magnanimity that approached the world itself as a treasure, as the source of a richness of experience that stands as an example to us all. Only Janet could make the unfledged spectator appreciate the balletic grace of a good hockey game. At the same time, she knew the virtue of a good heckle – knew that shyness and reserve are not healthy for the soul.

With friends, colleagues, and patrons, Janet struck that rare balance: a fundamentally “unconditional kindness” combined with the courage and honesty always to speak her mind. She will be remembered as someone who lived life after her own fashion, without needing or wanting to impose her way on anyone else. We mourn her loss; we look to the light of her memory. May the spirit of this “Rabelaisian librarian” always kindle that “mischievous glow” in the eyes of those whom her humor, wisdom, and generosity touched. Or in the words of a colleague, “For the last year, since she retired...when I would get stuck, I would ask: what would Janet do?”

Written collaboratively by the GW Libraries Staff

NISO Altmetrics White Paper

Catholic University - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 15:18

Are you wondering about altmetrics? The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) is in the midst of a project to define and promote community-based standards and recommended practices for alternative metrics.

From: NISO Issues Altmetrics White Paper Draft for Comment

“Citation reference counts and the Journal Impact Factor have historically been the main metric used to assess the quality and usefulness of scholarship,” explains Martin Fenner, Technical Lead Article-Level Metrics for the Public Library of Science (PLOS) and consultant to NISO for the project. “While citations will remain an important component of research assessment, this metric alone does not effectively measure the expanded scope of forms of scholarly communication and newer methods of online reader behavior, network interactions with content, and social media. A movement around the use of alternative metrics, sometimes called ‘altmetrics,’ has grown to address the limitations of the traditional measures. With any new methodology, however, issues arise due to the lack of standards or best practices as stakeholders experiment with different approaches and use different definitions for similar concepts. NISO’s Altmetrics project gathered together the variety of stakeholders in this arena to better understand the issues, obtain their input on what issues could best be addressed with standards or recommended practices, and prioritize the potential actions. This white paper organizes and summarizes the valuable feedback obtained from over 400 participants in the project and identifies a road forward for Phase II of the project.”

The White Paper is open for public comment through July 18, 2014. It is available with a link to an online commenting form on the NISO Altmetrics Project webpage, along with the detailed output documents and recordings from each of the meetings and related information resources.

Post expires at 3:08pm on Friday July 18th, 2014

Categories: University News

Marymount president honored by American Hungarian Federation

Marymount University - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 13:53
– Marymount University President Matthew D. Shank received the American Hungarian Federation’s Service Award at the 8th Annual Hungarian Charity Ball at the Sheraton Premiere at Tyson’s Corner.
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