WRLC Libraries

Interesting Find in the NEA Collection: Roots of America

The George Washington University - Tue, 08/15/2017 - 12:04

Schools have always been a crucial building block of what makes America. It is a place where our young people can learn our common history, our civic laws, and the common ideals that continue to shape our nation.

Attend a Workshop from Anywhere!

The George Washington University - Tue, 08/01/2017 - 13:23
August 1, 2017

Your first stop to learn a new skill, improve your research, or manage and visualize your data is the GW Libraries and Academic Innovation workshop series. Many library workshops are being offered in real time via WebEx and you can participate fully in these sessions from your home, office, or anywhere you have a computer and internet access. Online or in-person, library workshops are free for GW students, faculty, and staff. Below is a list of upcoming workshops set up for remote attendance:

Research Data

Using the Open Science Framework for Digital Humanities | THU 9·21 | 12:30-1:30pm

Visualizing Data with Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Finding GIS Data and Resources | TUE 10·24 | 6-8pm
GIS Interface Basics | TUE 11·7 | 6-8pm
Creating a Map & Cartographic Skills | THU 11·9 | 6-8pm
Spatial Analysis with QGIS | TUE 11·15 | 6-8pm

Build Your Skills

Google Drive: File Management & Beyond | TUE 10·10 | 1-2:30pm 

Lit Review How To Bootcamp

Monday, October 9

Basics of Graduate Research in Engineering | 10-10:30am 
Keeping Up with New Research  | 10:30-11am
Exploring Beyond Gelman: Advanced Research Skills | 11-11:30am 
The Logic of Citations: Understanding MLA, APA & Chicago Styles | 1-1:30pm 
Citation Chasing & Cited Reference Searching | 1:30-2pm 
Zotero In-Depth | 2:30-3pm 
Exploring the New Refworks | 3-3:30pm 

 

National Teacher Appreciation Week

The George Washington University - Tue, 05/09/2017 - 11:28

May 8-May 12 is National Teacher Appreciation Week, where Americans are given the opportunity to thank the teachers who work so hard to educate us all.

New Material in the NEA Collection: The Papers of Buena Stolberg, President of the Department of Classroom Teachers

The George Washington University - Wed, 03/08/2017 - 16:58

This past fall, the papers of Buena Stolberg, President of the Department of Classroom Teachers between 1960 and 1961, were adde

Presidents' Day Boot Camp for Graduate Students

The George Washington University - Thu, 02/16/2017 - 12:39
February 16, 2017

Are you a graduate student working on a literature review for a thesis or dissertation?  Get serious about your scholarship and learn tips that will save your time and sanity. Our "boot camp" on Presidents' Day offers several popular workshops together - attend one or all.

All sessions will take place in Gelman Library, Room 219 and online via WebEx. GW community members may attend any session via WebEx by clicking here. 

Please bring your own computer.  Kids off school? Quiet and happily occupied offspring are welcome.

Monday, February 20 (President's Day):
9:00-9:30: The Basics of Graduate Research
9:30-10:00: Exploring Beyond Gelman: Advanced Research Skills
10:00-10:30:  Keeping Up With New Research
11:00-Noon:  Data Analysis at Your Fingertips: Using Google Sheets
1:00-1:30: The Logic of Citations: Understanding MLA, APA, and Chicago Styles
1:30-2:00:  Citation Chasing & Cited Reference Searching
2:00-2:30: Zotero In-Depth

The Basics of Graduate Research
What is a literature review, and what information do you need to begin one? Librarian Zach Elder will give you tips on how to begin your search, discover keywords, and narrow your topic. Save time and frustration by discovering how to find the right databases and resources for your discipline using GW Libraries’ tools.

Exploring Beyond Gelman: Advanced Research Skills
How do you know what research is out there? How can you discover what is available beyond the GW Libraries? Be sure with a comprehensive search of all published book literature using Worldcat. This workshop is best for disciplines that write books, especially the humanities and social sciences.

Keeping Up With New Research
A successful graduate student participates in the research conversation of their field. Librarian Debbie Bezanson will show you how to keep up with new research in your area of study. You'll learn how to set up journal table of contents alerts, search alerts, and identify key journals in your field.

Data Analysis at Your Fingertips: Using Google Sheets
Like other spreadsheet software, Google Sheets provides powerful tools for aggregating, analyzing, and visualizing data. This workshop covers core features of Sheets, including pivot tables and charts, as well as importing and sharing data.

The Logic of Citations: Understanding MLA, APA, and Chicago Styles
Are you baffled by how to cite your sources and why it is even necessary? This short workshop will clear up the confusion and help you understand the fundamentals of citation, as well as the particular expectations of the MLA, APA, and Chicago styles. Librarian Tolonda Henderson will discuss both print resources (books, journal articles, etc.) and digital resources (web pages, etc.).

Citation Chasing & Cited Reference Searching
How do you build on someone else's research? How do you find the research they used? Librarian Dorinne Banks will show you how to chase down those citations like a pro in this short workshop.

Zotero In-Depth
Once you've done all that research how do you keep track of it? Do you wish you had a way to keep all your citations in one place? Come learn about Zotero, "a free, easy-to-use tool to help you collect, organize, cite and share your research sources."

If you can't make it to all of the sessions or need more information be sure to check out the research guide "What Graduate Students Need to Know."

Securing Your Drupal Site

The George Washington University - Thu, 01/26/2017 - 13:40
January 26, 2017Christian Aldridge, Web Developer for Libraries & Academic Innovation

If you’re patching your Drupal installation regularly (core and module updates) you’re halfway there.

An important disclaimer: I’m not addressing the server environment (LAMP stack) in this post, which is critical to security. If you’re using a hosting service, be sure to check on their security policies and makes sure they’re updating your server.

Part 1: Secure Your Connection

Make sure you’re configured to pass login and form submissions over a secure connection. If you’re using a hosted service, check their options for adding a certificate to your site: on some services (like Dreamhost) it’s as simple as checking some boxes.

In a future post I’ll address adding certificates to your site in detail (configuring Apache and generating certificates) so you can run connections securely over https using SSL (Secure Socket Layer).

If your site accepts both http and https requests (instead of routing all requests over https), I recommend the Secure Login module (https://www.drupal.org/project/securelogin). This will let you force login requests and form submissions over https. Why is this important? If you don’t use a secure connection for logins or forms, all the submitted information (including passwords) is sent using clear text (unencrypted plain text) and can be intercepted.

These are the settings I tend to use, which include forcing forms of any kind to submit over a secure connection:

Note: if you’re using the Drupal login block on a page and you’re using Secure Login, that page will load over https. By default new Drupal 7 installations include the login block on the home page.

A last point on securing your site: it’s good for SEO! Google ranks secure sites higher, so you can check off another box on your Search Engine Optimization to-do list.

Part 2: Accessible Spam Protection

On my sites I use the aptly-named Honeypot module (https://www.drupal.org/project/honeypot), a simple and effective way to catch spam in forms (comments, contact forms, anything that allows an anonymous user to submit something). I prefer Honeypot over Captcha because (a) it’s invisible to the user and (b) it meets accessibility requirements.

Comment sections tend to be hit the most on the Drupal sites I’ve built, and with Honeypot I’ve reduced spam to very manageable crumbs. If new comments from anonymous users are set to require approval (which I highly recommend) this will keep your site “spam free” on the user side and limit the spammed comments to a trickle that are easily deleted.

Once you install the module, you can adjust the settings from the configuration page:

I’d start with the default settings and then adjust from there if anything is getting through. I recommend starting with the time limit setting first, then tinkering with the element name if spam is still managing to get through. And remember to check the logs!

These two easy steps will help make your Drupal site both more secure and less of a headache.

Securing Your Drupal Site

The George Washington University - Thu, 01/26/2017 - 13:40
January 26, 2017Christian Aldridge, Web Developer for Libraries & Academic Innovation

If you’re patching your Drupal installation regularly (core and module updates) you’re halfway there.

An important disclaimer: I’m not addressing the server environment (LAMP stack) in this post, which is critical to security. If you’re using a hosting service, be sure to check on their security policies and makes sure they’re updating your server.

Part 1: Secure Your Connection

Make sure you’re configured to pass login and form submissions over a secure connection. If you’re using a hosted service, check their options for adding a certificate to your site: on some services (like Dreamhost) it’s as simple as checking some boxes.

In a future post I’ll address adding certificates to your site in detail (configuring Apache and generating certificates) so you can run connections securely over https using SSL (Secure Socket Layer).

If your site accepts both http and https requests (instead of routing all requests over https), I recommend the Secure Login module (https://www.drupal.org/project/securelogin). This will let you force login requests and form submissions over https. Why is this important? If you don’t use a secure connection for logins or forms, all the submitted information (including passwords) is sent using clear text (unencrypted plain text) and can be intercepted.

These are the settings I tend to use, which include forcing forms of any kind to submit over a secure connection:

Note: if you’re using the Drupal login block on a page and you’re using Secure Login, that page will load over https. By default new Drupal 7 installations include the login block on the home page.

A last point on securing your site: it’s good for SEO! Google ranks secure sites higher, so you can check off another box on your Search Engine Optimization to-do list.

Part 2: Accessible Spam Protection

On my sites I use the aptly-named Honeypot module (https://www.drupal.org/project/honeypot), a simple and effective way to catch spam in forms (comments, contact forms, anything that allows an anonymous user to submit something). I prefer Honeypot over Captcha because (a) it’s invisible to the user and (b) it meets accessibility requirements.

Comment sections tend to be hit the most on the Drupal sites I’ve built, and with Honeypot I’ve reduced spam to very manageable crumbs. If new comments from anonymous users are set to require approval (which I highly recommend) this will keep your site “spam free” on the user side and limit the spammed comments to a trickle that are easily deleted.

Once you install the module, you can adjust the settings from the configuration page:

I’d start with the default settings and then adjust from there if anything is getting through. I recommend starting with the time limit setting first, then tinkering with the element name if spam is still managing to get through. And remember to check the logs!

These two easy steps will help make your Drupal site both more secure and less of a headache.

Interesting Find in the Collection: Beyond Segregation: The Problem of Power

The George Washington University - Wed, 01/25/2017 - 15:32

The National Education Association, as advocates for educators and public education, took on a unique role in the wake of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling.

Interesting Find in the Collection: Beyond Segregation: The Problem of Power

The George Washington University - Wed, 01/25/2017 - 15:32

The National Education Association, as advocates for educators and public education, took on a unique role in the wake of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling.

Attend a Workshop from Anywhere!

The George Washington University - Wed, 12/28/2016 - 13:23
December 28, 2016

Your first stop to learn a new skill, improve your research, or manage and visualize your data is the GW Libraries and Academic Innovation workshop series. Many library workshops are being offered in real time via WebEx and you can participate fully in these sessions from your home, office, or anywhere you have a computer and internet access. Online or in-person, library workshops are free for GW students, faculty, and staff. Below is a list of upcoming workshops set up for remote attendance:

Research Data

Data Demystified | FRI 2·24 | 11:30-Noon
Data Management | FRI 2·24 | Noon-12:30
Data Analysis at Your Fingertips Using Google Sheets | MON 2·20 | 11-Noon
Collecting Social Media Data with Social Feed Manager | TUE 2·14 | Noon-1:30pm

Visualizing Data with GIS

Intro to Geographic Information Systems | WED 1·25 | 5-6pm
Finding GIS Data and Resources | WED 2·8 | 5-6pm
GIS Interface Basics | WED 2·22 | 5-6pm

Ready to Work Career Series

Developing Engaging Presentations | THU 3·2 | 11:30-12:30 
Building a WordPress Portfolio |  FRI 3·31 | 11:30-12:30 

Research at the Next Level

Monday, February 20

Basics of Graduate Research | 9-9:30am 
Exploring Beyond Gelman: Advanced Research Skills | 9:30-10am 
Keeping Up with New Research | 10-10:30am

Friday, March 3

Basics of Graduate Research | 1-1:30pm
Exploring Beyond Gelman: Advanced Research Skills | 1:30-2pm 
Keeping Up with New Research | 2-2:30pm

Citations Made Simple Monday, February 20

The Logic of Citations: Understanding MLA, APA, and Chicago Styles | 1-1:30pm 
Citation Chasing & Cited Reference Searching | 1:30—2 pm 
Zotero In-Depth | 2-2:30pm

Friday, March 3

The Logic of Citations: Understanding MLA, APA, and Chicago Styles | 10:30-11am 
Citation Chasing & Cited Reference Searching | 11-11:30am
Zotero In-Depth | 11:30 – Noon

Attend a Workshop from Anywhere!

The George Washington University - Wed, 12/28/2016 - 13:23
December 28, 2016

Your first stop to learn a new skill, improve your research, or manage and visualize your data is the GW Libraries and Academic Innovation workshop series. Many library workshops are being offered in real time via WebEx and you can participate fully in these sessions from your home, office, or anywhere you have a computer and internet access. Online or in-person, library workshops are free for GW students, faculty, and staff. Below is a list of upcoming workshops set up for remote attendance:

Research Data

Data Demystified | FRI 2·24 | 11:30-Noon
Data Management | FRI 2·24 | Noon-12:30
Data Analysis at Your Fingertips Using Google Sheets | MON 2·20 | 11-Noon
Collecting Social Media Data with Social Feed Manager | TUE 2·14 | Noon-1:30pm

Visualizing Data with GIS

Intro to Geographic Information Systems | WED 1·25 | 5-6pm
Finding GIS Data and Resources | WED 2·8 | 5-6pm
GIS Interface Basics | WED 2·22 | 5-6pm

Ready to Work Career Series

Developing Engaging Presentations | THU 3·2 | 11:30-12:30 
Building a WordPress Portfolio |  FRI 3·31 | 11:30-12:30 

Research at the Next Level

Monday, February 20

Basics of Graduate Research | 9-9:30am 
Exploring Beyond Gelman: Advanced Research Skills | 9:30-10am 
Keeping Up with New Research | 10-10:30am

Friday, March 3

Basics of Graduate Research | 1-1:30pm
Exploring Beyond Gelman: Advanced Research Skills | 1:30-2pm 
Keeping Up with New Research | 2-2:30pm

Citations Made Simple Monday, February 20

The Logic of Citations: Understanding MLA, APA, and Chicago Styles | 1-1:30pm 
Citation Chasing & Cited Reference Searching | 1:30—2 pm 
Zotero In-Depth | 2-2:30pm

Friday, March 3

The Logic of Citations: Understanding MLA, APA, and Chicago Styles | 10:30-11am 
Citation Chasing & Cited Reference Searching | 11-11:30am
Zotero In-Depth | 11:30 – Noon

We're Getting a New Look in January!

The George Washington University - Wed, 12/21/2016 - 11:13
December 21, 2016

The library webpages (library.gwu.edu) are getting a new look before the new academic year begins in January, 2017! This new look will bring the library website more in line with GW's other sites and improve the experience for our users. While things will look different when you visit in January, most things will not change. You'll still find the same content in the same places and the same menu items. Below is a summary of what you can expect. Check back here for updates and a sneak preview!

Things that WON'T change:

  • Menu names and items that appear when mousing over them will remain the same.
  • While header and footers will change, the content between them will not change except on the home page.
  • The look of the search box will change, but the search options and the results they return will not be affected.  
  • URLs will remain the same. No need to update bookmarks or syllabi because of this change.

Things that WILL change:

  • The home page will look and feel more current and more like GW. 
  • A new header on each internal page will add easy options to access popular pages.
  • A new footer presents easier to read infomation and links.

We're Getting a New Look in January!

The George Washington University - Wed, 12/21/2016 - 11:13
December 21, 2016

The library webpages (library.gwu.edu) are getting a new look before the new academic year begins in January, 2017! This new look will bring the library website more in line with GW's other sites and improve the experience for our users. While things will look different when you visit in January, most things will not change. You'll still find the same content in the same places and the same menu items. Below is a summary of what you can expect. Check back here for updates and a sneak preview!

Things that WON'T change:

  • Menu names and items that appear when mousing over them will remain the same.
  • While header and footers will change, the content between them will not change except on the home page.
  • The look of the search box will change, but the search options and the results they return will not be affected.  
  • URLs will remain the same. No need to update bookmarks or syllabi because of this change.

Things that WILL change:

  • The home page will look and feel more current and more like GW. 
  • A new header on each internal page will add easy options to access popular pages.
  • A new footer presents easier to read infomation and links.

Introducing the 2017 Kiev Fellows

The George Washington University - Tue, 12/20/2016 - 15:17
December 19, 2016

Congratulations to our two 2017 Kiev Fellows who will be starting their research in the Kiev Judaica Collection in the spring semester. The biennial Kiev Judaica Collection Fellowship Program provides an award for short-term scholarly research, creative, or educational projects informed by the holdings of the I. Edward Kiev Judaica Collection. These awardees will present their work at the end of the fellowship in an open event for the community. 

Melanie Meyers is a senior manager for reference and outreach at The Center for Jewish History. She will use materials in the Kiev Collection that were both stamped by the Nazi confiscation stamp, and may also have passed through the Offenbach Depot, in her research on looted books and libraries during WWII and it’s aftermath. Her project traces the path of books from their original repositories through the sorting point of the Offenbach Archival Depot, where they were either returned to their origin libraries, or sent to alternate institutions. Her team at The Center for Jewish History have spent years creating and maintaining a digital map of these libraries, which they hope to expand with additional educational resources developed during this fellowship. 

Garrett Dome is a GW sophomore majoring in philosophy. His project will examine the writings of Maimonides in both the context of Jewish history and philosophy, focusing on the Moreh Nevukhim, otherwise known as The Guide for the Perplexed, which contains Maimonides most essential philosophical writings. He will use a copy of Maimonides’ Guide translated by Samuel ibn Tibbon, which is available in the Kiev Collection. Working with a translator, Garrett will focus on Tibbon's translation from 1204 as a way to understand the nuances and complexity of Maimonides’ language. 

 

 

Introducing the 2017 Kiev Fellows

The George Washington University - Tue, 12/20/2016 - 15:17
December 19, 2016

Congratulations to our two 2017 Kiev Fellows who will be starting their research in the Kiev Judaica Collection in the spring semester. The biennial Kiev Judaica Collection Fellowship Program provides an award for short-term scholarly research, creative, or educational projects informed by the holdings of the I. Edward Kiev Judaica Collection. These awardees will present their work at the end of the fellowship in an open event for the community. 

Melanie Meyers is a senior manager for reference and outreach at The Center for Jewish History. She will use materials in the Kiev Collection that were both stamped by the Nazi confiscation stamp, and may also have passed through the Offenbach Depot, in her research on looted books and libraries during WWII and it’s aftermath. Her project traces the path of books from their original repositories through the sorting point of the Offenbach Archival Depot, where they were either returned to their origin libraries, or sent to alternate institutions. Her team at The Center for Jewish History have spent years creating and maintaining a digital map of these libraries, which they hope to expand with additional educational resources developed during this fellowship. 

Garrett Dome is a GW sophomore majoring in philosophy. His project will examine the writings of Maimonides in both the context of Jewish history and philosophy, focusing on the Moreh Nevukhim, otherwise known as The Guide for the Perplexed, which contains Maimonides most essential philosophical writings. He will use a copy of Maimonides’ Guide translated by Samuel ibn Tibbon, which is available in the Kiev Collection. Working with a translator, Garrett will focus on Tibbon's translation from 1204 as a way to understand the nuances and complexity of Maimonides’ language. 

 

 

GW History Online

The George Washington University - Mon, 11/28/2016 - 16:52
November 28, 2016

The GW University Archives is proud to announce, GW Past, a new online resource featuring essays, lists and timelines designed to share highlights and summaries from GW's nearly 200-year history. This includes information about GW's founding and location, as well as brief histories of some of the past and present schools and divisions that make up GW.

GW Past joins our digital collections pages as part of our committment to making GW history as accessible as possible through ongoing programs to digitize and publish historical GW photographsGW publications and GW student publications

GW Past is a service of the GW University Archives, which is a rich resource for information on GW's history. If you don't see an answer to your question online, if you are looking for more in-depth information, or if you have additional historical material to contribute, please contact University Archivist Christie Peterson or email archives@gwu.edu.

GW History Online

The George Washington University - Mon, 11/28/2016 - 16:52
November 28, 2016

The GW University Archives is proud to announce, GW Past, a new online resource featuring essays, lists and timelines designed to share highlights and summaries from GW's nearly 200-year history. This includes information about GW's founding and location, as well as brief histories of some of the past and present schools and divisions that make up GW.

GW Past joins our digital collections pages as part of our committment to making GW history as accessible as possible through ongoing programs to digitize and publish historical GW photographsGW publications and GW student publications

GW Past is a service of the GW University Archives, which is a rich resource for information on GW's history. If you don't see an answer to your question online, if you are looking for more in-depth information, or if you have additional historical material to contribute, please contact University Archivist Christie Peterson or email archives@gwu.edu.

International Collections Showstoppers

The George Washington University - Mon, 11/28/2016 - 11:25
November 28, 2016

Wednesday, November 30
3:00-6:00 p.m.
Global Resources Center (Gelman 708)
International candy!

Check out some of our favorite acquisitions found only in the Global Resources Center (Gelman 708). From Iranian schoolbooks to Russian resistance zines; from Japanese literature to Chinese military newspapers; from North Korean textbooks to classic works of Islamic law, the GRC's librarian-experts have chosen some of their most unique and interesting pieces to give you a break from studying! A diverse selection of international candy will be available to try and GRC experts will be on hand to answer any and all questions about the material.

On display, will be rare and special holdings in the areas of:
Samizdat, Tamizdat, and Underground Rock
Resistance and Dissent
Islamic Law – Highlights from the Damghani Collection
Government Documents and Statistics
Language, Education, and Literature
Security and Terrorism

 

International Collections Showstoppers

The George Washington University - Mon, 11/28/2016 - 11:25
November 28, 2016

Wednesday, November 30
3:00-6:00 p.m.
Global Resources Center (Gelman 708)
International candy!

Check out some of our favorite acquisitions found only in the Global Resources Center (Gelman 708). From Iranian schoolbooks to Russian resistance zines; from Japanese literature to Chinese military newspapers; from North Korean textbooks to classic works of Islamic law, the GRC's librarian-experts have chosen some of their most unique and interesting pieces to give you a break from studying! A diverse selection of international candy will be available to try and GRC experts will be on hand to answer any and all questions about the material.

On display, will be rare and special holdings in the areas of:
Samizdat, Tamizdat, and Underground Rock
Resistance and Dissent
Islamic Law – Highlights from the Damghani Collection
Government Documents and Statistics
Language, Education, and Literature
Security and Terrorism

 

An Evening with General David Petraeus

The George Washington University - Mon, 11/21/2016 - 10:38
November 21, 2016

Friday, December 16
6:00 - 7:00 p.m.
National Churchill Library & Center (Gelman 101)
RSVP required

Please join us as the National Churchill Library and Center welcomes General David Petraeus for a discussion on strategic leadership and current global challenges, and a reflection on Winston Churchill as a leader in war and peace. RSVP is required for this exclusive event so please reserve your seat here

General Petraeus, a renowned counterinsurgency expert, served for nearly four decades in the U.S. Army. His commands included coalition forces in Iraq, U.S. Central Command, and coalition forces in Afghanistan. He was widely credited for his leadership of the Surge in Iraq that sharply reduced sectarian violence. Upon his retirement from the military, he took up the post of CIA Director. The General is a Partner with the global investment firm KKR, and the Chairman of the KKR Institute.

Located on the 1st floor of Gelman Library, the National Churchill Library and Center is the first research center dedicated to the study of Sir Winston Churchill in our nation’s capital. The new center’s research resources and interdisciplinary programs offer GW students, faculty, researchers, and the public the opportunity to examine the life and legacy of Churchill.

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